How to Join Galvinized Pipe to Copper Pipe?


What is the preferred method for joining galvanized pipe to copper pipe? One plumber told me he would thread the galvianized pipe the apply a fitting that would connect the copper pipe to the galvanied pipe and another plumber told me he had a fitting he would use that didn't require threading the galvanized pipe to connect copper pipe to it.
Does it matter which one is used?
Are the solderless copper fittings good that join copper pipes?
Thanks
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http://www.rd.com/familyhandyman/content/32499 /
R
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Depends on what the fluid is. For water, not very common, but sometimes necessary in replacing inoperative main household valves. Fittings for lube oil, compressed air and air conditioning lines are often solderless. For household water service soldered copper is preferred, might even be code required in some areas. Connecting galvanized to copper is often done using a simple copper threaded sweat fitting to the threaded pipe. Some communities allow natural gas and propane to use copper lines, usually with solderless connectors, and the low pressures allow fairly simple fittings. IMO. the plumber who threads the galvanized pipe is likey to produce the best job. HTH
Joe
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wrote:

Depends on what the fluid is. For water, not very common, but sometimes necessary in replacing inoperative main household valves. Fittings for lube oil, compressed air and air conditioning lines are often solderless. For household water service soldered copper is preferred, might even be code required in some areas. Connecting galvanized to copper is often done using a simple copper threaded sweat fitting to the threaded pipe. Some communities allow natural gas and propane to use copper lines, usually with solderless connectors, and the low pressures allow fairly simple fittings. IMO. the plumber who threads the galvanized pipe is likey to produce the best job. HTH
This is for replacing an old piece of galvanized cold water supply pipe.
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Dielectric union. Period. The galvanized side is threaded. Period. The copper side is soldered. period.
Hope that clears that up.
Bob Wheatley
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ok
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and galvanized.
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Abe wrote: ...

Actually, I saw a new one (to me, IANAP) relatively recently -- similar problem; old galvanized in very difficult to access location in service tunnel in old church building. Local plumber had a compression-type fitting designed for the purpose of threadless connection to galvanized.
I don't recall the specific brand name but it works and is designed specifically for the purpose. It is comparatively pricey relative to an ordinary dielectric union, however, but in a situation as we had the labor to manage to thread the other or remove even more back to a next joint would far outweigh the cost of the part. (Of course, one of these days, the whole thing will have to come out, but that's a story for another day; hopefully after I'm no longer on Trustees :) ).
So, I think the answer to the original question is "it depends, either technique can be ok if it's the right product".
--



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boy I woul;d replace all the galvanized, PEX is cheap and easy to work with.
patching glavanized is a loser.
eventually whats left either clogs or leaks.
way better to replace the galvanized and get on wuth your life:)
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote: ...

Well, if you want to come do this nobody will stop you and will be glad to hand you stuff if you can get there to do it...but you had best be skinny and flexible.
--
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with.
patching glavanized is a loser.
eventually whats left either clogs or leaks.
way better to replace the galvanized and get on wuth your life:)
He gave me a piece of the old galvanized pipe and couldn't see daylight through it. Kinda like my arteries. I am going to have the galvanized replaced w/ copper or some sort of PVC. I'll find out from the plumber the correct name of the PVC, What is PEX?
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He used some sort of threaded fitting that includes a brass fitting. I wonder if that's a dielectric fitting?
I9t appears he did a nice job cutting out the old leaking galvanized pipe then replacing it w/ copper. However, the galvanized pipe is leaking in another place. When I called thewm back they recommended replacing all the galvanized(tub, sink and toilet in the bathroom w/ copper pipe then connecting them to the all copper pipe in the the basement = cost $1,200.00. They also said it might be cheaper to use some sort of PVC pipe instead of copper, which would be less money then the copper, but I'm concerned about the durability of the PVC type.
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news:sMwkk.261373>

I second Bob's contention.
The reason you want a dielectric union is that it will prevent corrosion from eating your pipes.
If a person calls himself a plumber and suggests otherwise, thank him for stopping by but inform him that you will hire a competent pro to do the job.
--
Roger Shoaf
If you are not part of the solution, you are not dissolved in the solvent.
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wrote in message

I think that's what he used.
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"What is the preferred method for joining galvanized pipe to copper pipe?"
Only one answer to the question here and Bob gave it.
kenny b
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