How to detect water drippage?

I'm trying to stop a slight leak in my car trunk, and I want to know when I've been successful. Generally there isn't enough rain for any water to accumulate in the trunk. However if I catch it when it's fresh, I can see a slight trail where the water dribbled down inside. This evaporates usually before I can see it. Is there something I can put on there (think litmus paper) that will "stain" or somehow detect the presence of water there and let me know that even after it dries?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You could try locking yourself in the trunk with a flashlight and have a trusting friend - (one thats gonna let you back out or locate the emerg inside trung release) - hit the area with a garden hose.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Place paper towels about the suspect leak in the truck. Hose the rear window down and then later check the towel for water spot (s).
I use this to help locate minor leaks under a kitchen/bath sink.
It helps to narrow the leak, but in a car I guess the water travels. YMMV.
Oren --
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
the dealer may know exactly where the leak is from, given all of that model probably leak at the same place.
might be worth the bucks
tried the locked in trunk, my trusted buddie and my girl friend decided to take me for a ride:(
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Let me be more clear. I know what I'm supposed to do to fix the leak. What I want to know is how to tell if it worked. The hose idea doesn't work because it usually takes an hour or more of rain before the leak shows. I'm looking for some "water detector" that can show a water stain or water trail even after it's dried.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Crepe paper shows changes when it gets wet. The dye also runs, so it might leave a trail. My grandmother used to use it to color her lips, because her very strict Baptist husband wouldn't allow lipstick.
--
Steve B.
New Life Home Improvement
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Granny was ingenious, huh?
Oren --
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Dust a layer of talcum powder over the area that you are suspicious of, it will wash off where the water hits it. Don't always expect the leak to be above and the water run down. I had a station wagon that developed a leak and would occasionally spray water on top of my head while I was driving! After tracing it, I found it was in the top of the rear wheel well, the spinning tires would send drops of water up into the small hole and over the back seat onto me. Good luck.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Talk it over with the folks at your favorite body shop. Part of the repair process is dealing with leaks that occur after the cosmetics are done. IIRC some shops used to have pressure blowers that attached to an open window which would allow an air leak to be tracked with sensitive microphone or a mechanics stethoscope with the probe removed. Water in car trunks is harder on the vehicle than most places because it can get hot and humid very easily and the area isn't paint protected to same degree as the rest of the car. HTH
Joe
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
jeffc wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
George wrote:

Newsprint has my vote; I used it to find a leak under my sink. For extra detective work, one might try dusting the channel around the trunk opening - very lightly - with some corn starch. Close lit, let it rain, and then see if there is a clean trail left by moisture coming in and running down the channel. The trunk really shouldn't have water enter around the lid .. got lights that aren't sealed up well inside?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I did - they said that was the primary suspect. But I had the light seal fixed - fixed the condensation problem on the light, but didn't help the rain.
I'm convinced it's coming in somehow/somewhere around the soft gasket/seal on the trunk door itself. A guy looked at it and was pretty sure that was it. Then the water goes somewhere inside the frame where I can't see it, and comes out and dribbles down a known path to my trunk floor. After I fix the seal, I just need to see if any water goes down that path. Often it's not enough water to make it to the bottom of the trunk and pool. I just need to know no water has gone down that path.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I had a car like that, the leak finally went away, when the car was replaced
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I've used paper towels for this too. While it would be better if it were still visible when it was dry, I don't see why that is a reqt. You just put the paper towels in place before it rains, then leave the car out for a few hours or overnight when it rains. Check in the morning. Unless it's blazing hot, it's still going to be wet.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.