How To Deal With Heavy Snow On Roof In Maryland

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On 1/24/2016 7:16 PM, Tony Hwang wrote:

I removed the text that Micky rudely center posted.
Well, that's worth a try. I doubt that small fire crackers will do much on a shingled roof. Got to be some thing that can be thrown onto the roof, and pulled off with an (already atached) rope. Lets think on this for a while. What throws, and then drags snow?
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On 1/24/2016 5:55 PM, Micky wrote:

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On 01/24/2016 03:34 PM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Avalanche control? How not to do it:
http://missoulian.com/news/local/child-adults-pulled-alive-from-mount-jumbo-avalanche/article_6259b476-a0cf-11e3-9a0c-0019bb2963f4.html
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On 1/24/2016 8:02 PM, rbowman wrote:

Story from March 2014. But, still interesting.
Got to be spooky, playing in the yard and then get burried by avalanche.
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On Sunday, January 24, 2016 at 2:19:15 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Others have suggested a snow rake, but you didn't mention how many stories the has. I use a snow rake on my garage overhang, but there is no way I can reach the roof on the main part of the house.
I do not suggest using a snow rake while on a ladder.
Hopefully, the roof system is such that the ice damming issue was taken into account when the roof was put on. Proper insulation, ice shield, attic venting, etc. If you are concerned about ice dams, you could fill some stockings or pantyhose with rock salt and place them along the edge of the roof to melt some snow and give the water a place to run off.
You could also get some ice melt wires and spread them on the edge of the roof. Ideally, they work best when installed properly *before* it snows, but they should help prevent ice dams a little if you can get them to melt down and lay along the edge of the roof.
Good luck!
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On 1/24/2016 12:19 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

The accumulated snow will want to trap additional moisture.

***If*** he (or his designated grunt) is physically fit, try to clear "as much as he can reach COMFORTABLY" from a ladder at the drip line. Ensure the gutters are clear of debris/packed snow as that will help keep water (from rain and snow melt) from backing up UNDER the lowest courses of shingles (assuming an asphalt shingled roof). Likewise, make sure the downspouts are clean so water doesn't dam up inside them (and pull them -- or the gutters -- off the house).
Remember that cardiac load when working with arms above head/shoulders is increased -- it's harder to lift a given weight of snow when your arms are *elevated* than when they are at your sides.
Also, recall that you don't have much mobility on a ladder. So, "twisting" to drop the snow off your rake/shovel will also put a lot of stress on your back.
[The *last* thing you want is a visit to ER (or morgue!) in the HOPE of avoiding a POSSIBLE roof failure.]
Remember that shingles lap over each lower course. So don't try to "shovel" in the same way that you would when trying to SCRAPE a driveway clean -- you'll just lift the shingles and risk breaking them (cold/brittle).
By no means should climbing ON the roof be attempted. Too easy to end up in a snowbank (if you are lucky!)

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On Sun, 24 Jan 2016 11:19:06 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Many years ago I had about 2 - 3 feet of snow-drift on a large section of my roof, that I managed to clear by climbing up and using my boots to break away large chunks and slide them off the edge, it proved easier than shovelling. Now I own a snow rake. The 3 6 foot sections plus my height allows me to get to my second story edges. The weight and ice-dam situations are both a worry. Good luck.
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On Sunday, January 24, 2016 at 2:19:15 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

This is really cool - no pun intended.
Use a length of string or wire.

http://youtu.be/gEnJJeNHTLs

http://youtu.be/gEnJJeNHTLs

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On 1/24/16 2:19 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

State Farm, Travelers, GEICO...and five Hail Marys...
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On 1/24/2016 2:19 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Off hand, I'm thinking that this is about 350 lb of snow. I've been wondering about my deck in the same situation and it would amount to several people which the deck could easily handle. If he can safely walk around on the roof, it should be safe but if not he should probably push off what he can.
You might check my calculations which I just did in my head considering an inch of water is equivalent to a foot of snow.
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On 1/25/2016 12:59 PM, Frank wrote:

What???! Did you slip a decimal, or so??

An inch of rain is about 10 inches of snow. So, he's got about 2 inches of water sitting on his roof -- or, 1/6 cubic foot per square foot.
A cubic foot of water is "about" 8 gallons. A gallon is "about" 8 pounds (pint ~= pound). So, cubic foot is "about" 64 pounds. He's got 1/6 of that -- about 10 pounds per square foot.
But, that's with *0* pitch.
Given that he's got a 5/12 slope (5" rise over 12" run), that's ~22 degrees. So, there's only ~9 pounds of DOWNWARD force on the roof (the rest is converted to a LATERAL force pushing outward against the supporting wall).
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On 1/25/2016 3:25 PM, Don Y wrote:

Thanks. Did not realize that 5/12 meant slope and that it was not a flat roof. Have read various densities for snow and his could be heavier. Our snow was fortunately light and easy for my snow thrower. My calc. would be ~6 lb/ft2 so we are not far off. Sometimes my head does slip a decimal or more ;)
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On 1/25/2016 5:49 PM, Frank wrote:

(pending) Rain complicates the math as it alters the "density" of the snow (for want of a better word). In New England, we often had very "wet" snows -- 6 inches would be too heavy to lift a shovelful (cuz the lower 3 inches would be "slush")

Brain fart. :>
Or, the explanation my friend offers most often: "keyboard error"! ;-)
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On 1/24/2016 2:19 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Ice dam. The weight of the snow is distributed over the entire surface area covered with snow and if the roof is pitched and structurally sound. it should bear the load OK. Remember that sometime rather heavy workman may walk around on a roof without damaging it.
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