How not to get stuck in snow

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On Tue, 11 Mar 2014 08:09:58 -0700, RobertMacy

Ground Loop!!!!
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I never liked the bottom of the steering wheel method. It was suggested that I try that when backing a trailer and I just couldn't get used to it. I do fine with my hand on the top, trailer or not.

Which is why I practice and think everybody should.
When I was much younger, I had a friend who felt the same way as I do - driving in reverse is a good skill to have. One Saturday night his transmission went bad and the only gear he had was reverse. I "followed" him as he drove over 10 miles in reverse to get the car home. For a short while - one exit's worth on the Van Wyck Expressway - we reached a decent speed. The only thing that slowed him down was the sound of the tranny.
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On Tue, 11 Mar 2014 17:10:24 +0000 (UTC), DerbyDad03

the open behind the removeable stamped steel grille that spent more time off than on. I'd be out at my girlfriend's place and it would start to rain - a driving west wind chasing it right up the road that I had to take to get to the highway to go home. (as well as numerous good-sized water puddles) Many a time I backed the little mini from the crowsfoot corner, through Winterbourne to the 86.
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On 2014-03-11 11:01 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

I disagree. I find it easier backing out. People will give you more room since they want to steal your spot. I also have a double-wide driveway, so I back out of the garage with no difficulty.
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On Mon, 10 Mar 2014 21:14:28 +0100, nestork

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On 3/10/2014 3:14 PM, nestork wrote:

All you have to do is kick them. But you want your tenants to knock them off their cars before they turn into the parking stall. You don't think they'd stop in the street to do that, do you? No, at best they'll stop in the parking lot, kick them off, then park. Either way, you'll get snow chunks accumulating in your parking lot, because it's winter time.

All they have to do is turn their wheels before backing up so as to not back right up and over the ice turds.
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Really? Would you care to explain how turning the wheel causes the rear wheels to not back up over ice turds that are directly behind the rear wheels?
Besides, the OP mentioned "parking stalls". How much can you turn while backing out of a parking stall?
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On 3/11/2014 9:04 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Most cars nowadays are front wheel drive, so most resistance comes from what's blocking the front wheels. Turn the front wheels a bit and the car can move much more easily. It then only has the hump behind one or both rear wheels to climb over, and it can now do so. You don't need to turn the wheels much, nor do you need to maintain the angle of turn beyond a foot of progress. Once you're past the lump, just straighten the wheels and keep moving.
I've only been dealing with this for the past month. We got several heavy snows, and the ice turd accumulation has been relentless. I had some drop off in my garage that I wasn't aware of until they'd frozen into place. So I had to slightly maneuver around them the same way I had to maneuver around the ones in the parking stalls at work.
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I used to allow a bit of 'running' space. Park slightly out of the space, then on start up gently drive forward, and ram it out in reverse and 'hop' over the clumps. Sadly, some parking lots do NOT allow backing into the stalls.
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'Oren[_2_ Wrote: > ;3209404']

Believe it or not, the law in Manitoba is that landlords are only required to remove snow from the access ways to the tenant's parking spots, not from the parking spots themselves. The parking spot is consider part of the space the tenant is renting, and it's their responsibility to maintain that space just in the same way as it's the tenant's responsibility to maintain a reasonable standard of cleanliness in their apartments. So, it's actually the tenant's responsibility to clear the snow that falls in their parking spot just as it's the tenant's responsibility to remove the dirt that accumulates on their apartment floors during their tenancy.
'Residential Tenancies Branch | Province of Manitoba' (http://tinyurl.com/oun5rhu )
The above web page contains the following statement:
In an outdoor parking lot, the landlord is responsible for clearing snow, when necessary, to give tenants access to their parking stall. The landlord doesnt have to remove snow from individual parking stalls, unless the tenant and landlord have agreed that this service will be provided.
Anyhow, I just wanted to let people know that it's good practice to remove those "ice turds" from their cars in a convenient location before parking their cars somewhere they have to back out over those things.
--
nestork


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On Thu, 13 Mar 2014 02:43:56 +0100, nestork

This is true if they have an assigned spot. If it is "general parking" the landlord may be responsible for clearing it all.

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