How many therms (natural gas) do you use per day (per month)?

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Donna Ohl, Grady Volunteer Coordinator wrote:

I use about 5-7 a month for two people in a small house during the summer, but that includes a stove and dryer as well. I think about 90 a month for a cold winter month, and this is in a 1948 house that is pretty much uninsulated except for the attic floor.
nate
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Well if you don't pay attention to climate, you're data is going to be 'all over the map'.
My bill for last month was 155 therms for a 2600 sqft house and family of four (gas laundry, gas water heater, gas stove, gas furnace). That's about 5.2 Therm/day. Mind you, in upstate NY we average about 1200 degree-days in January alone. So I average about 0.11 Therms/degree-day. My neighbors think that's a pretty low bill for January.
daestrom
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On Feb 16, 3:24 pm, "Donna Ohl, Grady Volunteer Coordinator"

FWIW, out gas bill comes with averages so you can compare. For November, their average was just under 30 ccf with an average temp of 44 F
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2,200 sf house in central California. Two people. Gas water heater, electric range and clothes dryer. Only a few days in the low thirities. Mostly high thirities to low forties. Bills ending middle of the month. November .6 therms per day, December 2.0, January 3.2, February 3.1. Average monthly usage for 2007 was 1.04 therms per day.
Don in Tracy, Calif.
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Only in Calforny what the hell is a therm come from Canada and never heard such a term take it it is to rate you energy use why not just double the rates and wear sweaters. We are at -29 celius right now and our gas meters are spinning away to the gas companies delight.
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jim wrote:

To each their own. I suppose we'll keep therms and you can keep Flesh Freeze Times.
Jeff
take it it is to rate you energy use why not just

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Donna Ohl, Grady Volunteer Coordinator wrote:

Possibly in south FL.
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I am billed in dekatherms, and assuming 10 therms to the dekatherm, my last bill (over 32 days) was for 5.96 Dth, therefore 59.6 therms, or 1.86 therms per day.
Background: small 1940s home in Oklahoma, mostly average temperatures for the month, gas furnace and water heater.
Incidentally, the meter reads in Mcf; a BTU factor is applied based on the quality of the gas received. The actual meter reading was 5.8 Mcf.
During the summer readings have been in the 2-Dth range per month, about 0.7 therms per day; however, this past October I replaced my 22-year-old water heater with a new tank, which should theoretically use a bit less gas than its predecessor.
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hath proclaimed:

Not sure what a Therm is, but we used 600 cubic metres last month and that was an estimate. So the actual number was probably higher.
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writes:

At last! Someone using a rational energy unit.

In fact, the BTU is one of the best of the British (actually now just American) units. It's 1055 Joules, but as a rule of thumb you can think of it as a kJ.
But having different units for every single energy source is just nuts.
Who else uses the therm, roughly .1 GJ, but the U.S. Gas industry?
www.oilnergy.com lists natural gas prices in MMBtu, where MM00*1000 or one million. That's pretty nice, just about the same thing as a GJ, so we and the Canucks can actually think we are talking the same language.
[And MMBtu ~= MCF, so we have a three-way match] -- George Cornelius cornelius ( A T ) eisner.decus.org
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George Cornelius wrote:

It's fairly useful for energy calculations when everything else is in SAE, or whatever you call not metric. Insulation (in the US) is rated in BTUs, square feet and degrees F. The amount of specific heat stored is 1 BTU per degree F per pound of water. Now if you mix in any metric, it all becomes completely unwieldly. Either all metric or none at all makes the most sense. I think we've had some rockets that smacked Mars because of that.
Jeff

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On Sat, 16 Feb 2008 13:24:44 -0700, "Donna Ohl, Grady Volunteer

Jan use: 220 therms (old masonry house, upstate NY) Annual: 1450
In the winter, we pretty consistently run about 0.2 therms per degree-day.
G
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Wikipedia isn't bad on the use of "therms": http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Water_heater
For measurement units, it says: Natural gas in the U.S. is measured in CCF (100 cubic feet), which is converted to a standardized heat content unit called the therm, equal to 100,000 British thermal units. A BTU is the energy required to raise one pound of water by one degree Fahrenheit. A U.S. gallon of water weighs 8.3 pounds. So, to raise a 40-gallon tank of 55 °F water up to 105 °F would require 40 x 8.3 x (105 − 55) / 100,000 BTU, or approximately 0.17 CCF, at 100% efficiency. A 40,000 BTU (per hour) heater would take 25 minutes to do this, at 100% efficiency. At $1 per therm, the cost of the gas would be about 17 cents.
As for usage ... it goes on to say: Water enters residences in the US at about 10 °C (50 °F) (varies with latitude and season). Adults generally prefer shower temperatures of 40–49 °C (105–120 °F), requiring the water temperature to be raised about 30 °C (55 °F) or more, if the hot water is later mixed with cold water. The Uniform Plumbing Code reference shower flow rate is 2.5 gpm (gallons per minute); sink and dishwasher usages range from 1–3 gpm.
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You can also use bubble wrap over your windows.
It's been friggin cold near Chicago , 117 total therms or 3.77 per day
www.cheapogroovo.com http://cheapogroovo.vox.com
In article <b4059b0a-383b-4aee-bf87-c338803924d8@

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wrote:

[snip]
For those who don't know, "friggin" is local slang for ice fishing on lake Michigan :-)
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Harry wrote:

Well there ya go, I had no clue? Who woulda "friggin" known?
--
Zyp



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Donna Ohl, Grady Volunteer Coordinator wrote:

    Our recent (Ohio) gas bill was $248 for 187 CCF = $1.33 per CCF.
            Angelo campanella
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wrote:

Based upon the "heating value" of that month's gas, I assume.
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Donna Ohl, Grady Volunteer Coo wrote:

Seattle, heat & water, 2800 sqft house (about 1800 sqft heated): My last bill shows 3.8 therms/day last month and about 2.5 therms/day average for the past year.
Since San Jose is considerably warmer than Seattle, I suspect you could get close to 2 therms/day down there...
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