How many breakers for the kitchen?

Page 1 of 2  

I was talking to a friend about my projects around the home and we got on the subject of re-wiring the kitchen. Something I'll have to do one of these days.
Anyway, when we discussed it he mentioned something about having to have separate breakers for certain appliances in order to meet code. He mentioned the refrigerator, the microwave, the garbage disposal, the oven (obviously).
Something in the back of my mind is thinking, the code restrictions can't be that inane, to the point where you'd have to have at LEAST 4 breakers just for the kitchen alone, and one of them will be a double pull. The garbage disposal I can see, the oven is a cinch, but the microwave? The refrigerator? These are not huge energy consumers.
Is my buddy out there in left field with this business of needing so many specialized breakers to meet today's code?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
My Kitchen has 6 breakers.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Eigenvector wrote:

I know you need at least two 20A small appliance circuits.
(Depending a little on the kitchen layout) I would put the fridge, microwave, gas stove ignitor, and vent hood together on one 20A circuit. Another 20A circuit for half the countertop outlets and the dishwasher, and another 20A for the other countertop outlets and the disposal. That's three 20's, and no electric range yet. The latest code may very well require another circuit for the dishwasher, microwave, or fridge that I've doubled-up; they've gone a little crazy lately IMHO about the required number of circuits.
You've also got the lights, and the convenience outlet along at least one non-countertop wall to deal with (but those could be picked up by circuits for the other rooms.)
Adding the extra circuits that you think are silly is easier than arguing with the inspector or code compliance office, and usually doesn't add that much to the cost. They may actually come in handy someday when you want to run a food processor, microwave, dishwasher, and two electric roasters, all at the same time.
Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Go to the library and look at the NEC code book. My suggestion is that every countertop outlet have its own breaker. Think about it. You plug in the roaster and the electric griddle, run the toaster, etc. The roaster and electric griddle will each come close to maxing out a 15a circuit. The toaster will take a good of another 15a circuit. The kitchen is the highest draw of the house, especially for a party! If you are going to do this you might just as well do it right the first time and not regret it for years afterwards.
Mike D.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Refrigerators use about 600watts. A normal microwave 1100 watts. Throw in a toaster or toaster oven and you'll get another 1000 watts.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have always been told to put the frig on a seperate circuit. Sometimes one plug as well. I just gutted my kitchen and put the frig and one plug on a single circuit. My two cents...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Its code and for good reason! Your microwave might be 600 watts, but a new one can be twice that!
Kitchens are large energy users, and need adquate wiring!
Then put furnace, washer, dryer, garage, outdoor outlets, AC, bath, sump pump, basement freezer, all on seperate circuits too
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Well I guess. It just seems like so damn wasteful to me. But I guess the numbers don't lie, just right there is 2 20 amp circuits plus a 15 for the fridge.
When did this become common/required?
It might be because I don't have a lot of things in the kitchen, I don't own a microwave, nor a toaster oven, don't have a dishwasher or a garbage disposal, I don't drink coffee either. So maybe I'm questioning this because I don't have to deal with all that crap. Doesn't mean I shouldn't put it in, if only so that my house has better resale value. And who knows maybe I'll marry some daddy's little princess who'll insist on all that junk.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Eigenvector wrote:

NEC code allows a 15 A or greater separate circuit for refrigerators. This is a common sense thing, as you don't want the fridge to quit because you tripped out the breaker with a waffle iron on the same circuit and didn't realize it. Some local buiding codes require the fridge to be all by itself, and freezers as well. As always, call city hall and ask. Inspectors are not all boobs, and can often explain the rationale for the rules. You know the kitchen must have GFCI's now, right? And 20 A receptacles are the norm in many codes. The typical 200 A service entrance has space for so many breakers now that using a half dozen spaces for the kitchen isn't any probklem. With breakers only $6 now, doing a tidy job isn't a budget buster. ood luck.
Joe
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Joe wrote: ..

..
Yea, but in real life having a second item on the circuit with a freezer or frig is a very good idea. A clock or night light is good. After all, do you really want to find out your freezer circuit went out three weeks after it tripped?
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia \'s Muire duit
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

On the other hand... if you go three weeks without ever opening the freezer, do you really even need one?
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

So the crockpot causes a breaker to pop and now the refrigerator is left not running for the next 8 hours. That does not make sense to me, but having a dedicated circuit sure does. Of course, you don't want the room to go dark if the toaster fries, so there is a separate circuit for lighting. You already agree on the oven and disposal, so how many breakers make sense now?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

If I was really worried about the fridge I would put it on the circuit with the lights so you would know when it tripped. The rule basically says the receptacles have to all be 20a, minimum 2, only serving the kitchen, pantry breakfast room or dining room, except a dedicated 15 can be used for the fridge. All others need to be 20s
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Eigenvector wrote:

Hi, Our kitchen is fed by a sub-panel. main panel is located in the basement. Lights, counter top outlets(duplex receptacles are all split), Oven, Fridge, M/W, Dishwasher, Garburater, etc.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have 6, and my refrigerator is on the same circuit as some outlets, so I probably need 7 to meet current code. Also, my garbage disposal and dishwasher share a circuit, some would say that is wrong; so 8. When entertaining we have to move coffee pots into other rooms since we don't have enough amps on the two outlet circuits, so 9. More than 9 is probably excessive...

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

As long as it is only on with other kitchen receptacles and it is a 20a circuit you are still code. It is only a 15 with a fridge on it that must be dedicated.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
http://www.faqs.org/faqs/electrical-wiring/part1 / and http://www.selfhelpandmore.com/homewiringusa/2002 /
Eigenvector wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Eigenvector wrote:

<snip>
FWIW ... My smaller kitchen ... fridge 15A, microwave 15A, 2 additional split outlets to serve both ends of the 8' counter (15A x 4). So that's 6 breakers plus the stove (40A x 2). And I'm in the process of gutting a bigger room to relocate that kitchen. When I do, I'll require at least one additional split outlet for the longer counter top surface.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
According to code, You need (2) small appliance Countertop circuitts, Refridgerator, micro, dishwasher garbage disposal Electric range/ cooktop need a two pole breaker, a trash compactor and general lighting All should have thier own 12/ 2 awg 20 amp circuits
Eigenvector wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have 12 breakers for my kitchen and that doesn't count the oven nor the cooktop.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.