How "green" buildings can quickly turn black.

http://www.nfpa.org/newsandpublications/nfpa-journal/2014/january-february-2014/features/perfect-storm?order_src46
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wrote:

I expect there will be a requirement for a module level shunt trip for solar collectors soon.
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I am not sure how the module level shunt would impact on the major concern, that of electrifying any metal structural components.
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wrote:

If the output of the cell was opened internally it would be a lot safer to work around. Another idea I heard was an opaque foam that would block the sun from getting to the collectors. Some people are actually rethinking the whole idea of roof mounted collectors Putting them on the roof sounds like a great idea until you start looking at the problems it poses. Fire is just one of them.
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On 4/23/2014 10:09 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I've installed quite a few shunt trip main breakers for electrical cooking equipment located under the exhaust hoods in restaurant kitchens. The breaker tripped off whenever the fire extinguisher system under the hood went off. I'm sure a simple fuse link can be installed in all the connectors of solar panels which will melt and disconnect the panel when it's hit with the heat from a fire. It's a simple inexpensive and reliable thing to do which would be an easy retrofit for existing panels. ^_^
TDD
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On 4/23/2014 2:58 PM, The Daring Dufas wrote:

That sounds safer than having energized wires, hanging,with insulation dripping off.
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On Wed, 23 Apr 2014 11:09:13 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Who is "some people?" The roof is the obvious choice for "average" homeowner. Sounds like an attempt to kill solar panels. I'm not in a position to install solar, but risk of fire wouldn't stop me. It's a small risk. I've only had one home fire, and it was arson. The roof wasn't involved. ROI is what matters.
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The problem is that they are still making electricity. If I read the article correctly, as the fire evolved and the structure began to weaken, then the functional part of the cell came into contact with the metal structure.
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On Wed, 23 Apr 2014 13:26:38 -0500, Vic Smith

One of the "some people" close to me was Florida Gulf Coast University. The chose a ground based installation for their solar farm. Ease of maintenance was one reason. For the homeowner, the biggest issue is having a roof leak. That is the best place to get a deal on used collectors, a tip from a roofer. That is where I got mine.
The fire issue is still valid and fire departments are starting to look at these as a hazard for their people, as pointed out in the article.
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