How does one remedy a waste pipe sag/belly???

During our occasional main line cleaning the service did a video and stated that we have a "sag" between our exit point and our septic tank. The sag occurs under our ground level deck so we are wondering what alternative methods of repair might be available.
Next spring we are hooking up to our new town sewers so it will be good bye to the septic tank and fields. We'd like to get this taken care of prior to that time.
Some Internet research has turned up solutions such as relining the main line (but I don't see how that would level out the sag) and/or raming a new pipe pushing the old pipe out of the way.
There must be some engineers and/or excavation guys here that have seen/done this before. So if you'd be so kind, I'd appreciate any suggestions (and anticipated costs) that can be provided.
Thanks
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normally the only solution is a shovel.....:(
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On Wednesday, October 23, 2013 2:58:13 PM UTC-7, BobMCT wrote:

How bad is the sag or in other words how long is it or what is the distance from the start of the deviation to the end of the deviation?
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On 10/23/2013 6:05 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

diameter pipe. I agree that the only solution I see is excavate and reset the line. Sending an underground bore will tend to follow the existing line.
If you have a 4" pipe with a 1" puddle, I wouldn't mess with it.
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On Wednesday, October 23, 2013 4:58:13 PM UTC-5, BobMCT wrote:

occurs under our ground level deck so we are wondering what alternative me thods of repair might be available. Next spring we are hooking up to our ne w town sewers so it will be good bye to the septic tank and fields. We'd li ke to get this taken care of prior to that time. Some Internet research has turned up solutions such as relining the main line (but I don't see how th at would level out the sag) and/or raming a new pipe pushing the old pipe o ut of the way. There must be some engineers and/or excavation guys here tha t have seen/done this before. So if you'd be so kind, I'd appreciate any su ggestions (and anticipated costs) that can be provided. Thanks
Around here. the septic tanks and fields are in the back yards, ant the new sewer lines will proably be up and down the back yards property lines also . So you are going to have to dig up the back yeard anyway to put the new line in to the sewer system. And, local laws may require you to fill the e xisting tank to prevent cave-ins sometime in the next 200 years> I would f ind out exactly what the connection to the new sewer line will require befo re worrying about the present sag as long as you can continue to flush.
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On Thursday, October 24, 2013 12:16:23 AM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net wrot e:

ag occurs under our ground level deck so we are wondering what alternative methods of repair might be available. Next spring we are hooking up to our new town sewers so it will be good bye to the septic tank and fields. We'd like to get this taken care of prior to that time. Some Internet research h as turned up solutions such as relining the main line (but I don't see how that would level out the sag) and/or raming a new pipe pushing the old pipe out of the way. There must be some engineers and/or excavation guys here t hat have seen/done this before. So if you'd be so kind, I'd appreciate any suggestions (and anticipated costs) that can be provided. Thanks

so. So you are going to have to dig up the back yeard anyway to put the ne w line in to the sewer system. And, local laws may require you to fill the existing tank to prevent cave-ins sometime in the next 200 years> I would find out exactly what the connection to the new sewer line will require be fore worrying about the present sag as long as you can continue to flush.
But his real issue is that the sag is under the back deck area, which I assume prevents access. Typically, unless it's an old sewer line, connecting to the sewer wouldn't involve running a new line all the way into the house. They tie in where convenient outside, so the digging could be many feet from the house and wouldn't require removing the deck.
But you have a good point. The guys who are doing the sewer hookups may have some kind of boring device that they could use to bore a straight hole under the deck. How likely that is IDK. But recently they were installing new plastic pipe down the street near my house. Pipe looked like it was 6" or so and they were only making holes in the pavement about every 40 ft or so. I didn't see how they were getting the pipe in, but they must tunnel it between openings using some eqpt. The problem is whether anyone can/will do that for this kind of small job. If he sees the sewer crew working in the area, he could present them with his problem.
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BobMCT wrote:

How much of a sag? You have an occasional cleaning. How often is this done. Is this a preventative cleaning, or due to problems with draining? If the recent cleaning should last until the sewer line is installed next Spring, I wouldn't bother with repairing the septic line. Save your money for the town sewer line usage costs.
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On Wednesday, October 23, 2013 5:58:13 PM UTC-4, BobMCT wrote:

Why did you clean? Did it stop up? I've never heard of an "occasional mai n line cleaning". If it's stopping up there then you need to remove some d eck boards and excavate. Pushing a new pipe through isn't going to help yo u, it will follow the old one. But you can probably just lift the pipe som e and pack some crushed stone under it. Do you have straight access to the pipe from the basement/crawl? You can usually see water sitting in a sagg ing pipe with a light if you can look straight into the pipe.
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On Wednesday, October 23, 2013 2:58:13 PM UTC-7, BobMCT wrote:

<snip> If you have lived there many years and had no problems, just forget about it.
I bought this house in 1976. Had tank pumped 5 years later (and every 5 since). First time revealed a good "sag" in the waste pipe from the house. Did nothing about it and have had no problems at all. I have never had the line "cleaned".
Harry K
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On Friday, October 25, 2013 11:34:00 AM UTC-4, Harry K wrote:

Did nothing about it and have had no problems at all. I have never had t he line "cleaned".

Probably depends on the drop before the sag. I know our main drain pipe dr ops about 30" just before it goes out the crawl space wall to the septic ta nk. If anything "stalled" in a sag outside underground, the back up would build up pressure pretty quickly because of all the waste water 30" higher. But if the floor level was close to the same level as the pipe exiting th e house that would not be the case and a clog might just stay in a sag. Th e op doesn't describe his specifics enough to know why he has a problem wit h the sag.
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