How do you tell good carpet from bad carpet?

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wrote:

Again, outside the obstacles and the overhead of the tools, the area is insignificant. It takes perhaps 30 seconds to wash the bathroom floor, no matter what size it is. It takes significantly more time to clean around the commode, though even that is small compared to other areas.

We didn't always have this much space either, which is perhaps why we enjoy it now. I don't want anything bigger, though. We did look at a couple of 3500ft^2 houses. I nixxed them. I had no idea what we'd put in the space. ;-)

Alabama, but we make up for the mild winters with the AC in the summer. It's still cheap compared to the other expenses of owning a house.

Certainly. That's why they make big houses, small houses, and I suppose someone out there even likes condos. ;-)
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wrote:

Doesn't the rubber backing wear off in time with multiple washings? Mine always do.

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Doesn't the rubber backing wear off in time with multiple washings? Mine always do. ========== I believe the dryer is the culprit there, not the washing.
Cheri
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Cheri wrote:

Other downside is, with cheap rugs and cheap vinyl, it is a lifetime commitment, since those rubber backs are notorious for staining the vinyl.
--
aem sends...

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Of course, if you have cheap rugs and ceramic tile (as I do), it's not a problem. If I had vinyl, I probably wouldn't need the rugs. That damned ceramic tile is COLD.
Cindy Hamilton
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I have never had a dryer; always used that Big Dryer in the Sky.
However, I was idiot enough to wash one rubber-backed rug on ***hot water setting***. QED.
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Yes. Nothing lasts forever.
I wash mine in cold water and dry them on low. This gives an acceptable lifetime for the rubber backing. I suppose I could hang them dry, but I can't be bothered.
Cindy Hamilton
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A bit like buying a mattress, isn't it? Carpet manufacturers used to publish thread counts but stopped doing it the request of retailers who didn't want that information available. Retailers argued that people were comparing thread counts on different types of carpet (berber vs shag for example). You might ask your sales person for the number and see if they will give it to you.
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Sorry - said thread count, but was thinking fiber weight. George's post expressed it far better...
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_I_ just (used to) look at the weave density. If I can easily separate the tufts and see the backing I trust I'm looking at crap. Comparing densities should provide a good idea of quality. I don't think they go to the trouble of disguising inferior material with a denser weave, but these days it wouldn't surprise me.
(I assess upholstered furniture first by the arm padding, then by weight.)

Somebody at your house must know how to vacuum. -----
- gpsman
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gpsman wrote:

The carpet fiber is just fine. It's the glue that holds the fibers to the backing that's disintegrating. I don't vacuum it at all any more 'cause the Hoover sucks up chunks of carpet.
In 37 years, the only contractors that have previously visited have been the roofer. I just had the place weatherized/insulated. I was shocked by the ineptitude of the contractors.
The most glaring example was that the nails holding down the subflooring protruded into the crawl space. They got tired of snagging on them, so they just pounded them back up into the floor. Wonder what happens to the heads when you pound them up?? Duh!!! I'm still finding lumps under the carpet that I have to bang down. That's another reason to go easy on the vacuuming.
I let 'em do stuff that I thought violated basic engineering principles because, "they are experienced and know what they're doing." Most of the stuff they screwed up was stuff they shouldn't have touched at all. After it was done, I regretted not throwing them out the first day. But how do you find someone who is NOT an idiot and takes pride in his work?
After reading the links presented in this thread, I dread the upcoming carpeting fiasco. Nobody is gonna take the time to do all the things set forth in the CRI installation guidelines in one of the links presented earlier in this thread.
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mike wrote:

Quality of work is the second reason to do-it-yourself (the first is cost).
I suspect the third reason for DIY is the pleasure of the effort and the pride in the result.
You might consider carpet tiles.
A few days after Hurricane Yikes, I scored about 2000 sq ft of 2x2 carpet tiles. A store in which they were installed suffered a wet floor and used that as an excuse to have their insurance pay for new carpeting.
For about half the tiles, evidently fixtures were sitting atop them for some years and they had no wear at all. Checking the manufacturer's number on the back, I discovered these commercial, heavy wear, carpet tiles retailed for about $40/yd!
Anyway, with some glue I've carpeted the library in my home and the office snack-bar. Looks swell and will last forever.
Point is, carpet tiles were a trivial DIY project.
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I used to think stain repellency was a good indicator. My brother had an off white carpet and I spilled red wine on it. I got the wine out with nothing but water. I had a new carpet intalled in a rental I lived in for about 6 yrs. The short nap changed to an unidentifiable fuzz in high traffic areas within 2-3 yrs and no doubt needed replacement after I moved.

Yikes! Carpets are one of the biggest rip-offs in home industry. After I helped my buddy/landlord install the carpet I mention above, I swore I'd never pay for carpet installation again. Building new steps (5!) for my deck was harder.
nb
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