How do I know if the electricity to light switch is off?

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wrote:

Even if it did, this would be one of those cases from grammar school where the child asks, Can I go to the bathroom? and the teacher replies May I go to the bathroom?
Or do teachers still care about that? In this thread they should.

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wrote:

In my case (shared neutral), it's just one outlet. I think it'd be better to rewire it so it gets both hot and neutral from the same circuit.
--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com
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A democracy is nothing more than mob rule, where 51% of the people may take away the rights of the other 49% - Thomas Jefferson...
BUT the 49% say..that's alright, it was a fair vote.- Levon
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Never bet that any wiring you did not do yourself is according to code. You are betting your life and I sure have seen many non-code installations.

--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
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I don't know what code allows, but at my front door, I have three switches. The two for lights inside and outside the door are on one breaker, and the three-way for the top of the stairs is on another breaker. I learned this the hard way.

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'does the code even allow one outlet box to have 2 seperate breakers powering it?'
If it doesn't, can you please explain a 240Vac receptacle to me please. :)
JW
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with a pin or clip so that if one side trips it will pull the other side off also.
The OP was referring to having multiple 120V circuits in a box. Most (novice) people assume that the entire box is dead when they flip one breaker for the circuit they are working on.... Then after arcing something or recieving a shock. "Oh! There must be a code vioaltion here!!"
Kevin
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'does the code even allow one outlet box to have 2 seperate breakers powering it?'
If it doesn't, can you please explain a 240Vac receptacle to me please. :)
JW
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When I do this kind of repair I use multiple safety measures:
(1) turn off power. I verify it by attempting to switch the lights on. The probability of switching off the wrong breaker and the lights just burned out is small.
(2) I test for electricity with a meter. One probe on a known ground, and the other probe on the metal parts that I'm going to touch.
(3) I stand/squat on a plastic chair or other insulating material
(4) I avoid touching two different metal parts with two limbs at the same time. This has become almost an instinct.
(5) I use gloves or pliers with insulation
Often I get lazy and did not use all 5 measures above. Sometimes I test for (2) with my hand with a quick flick to the wire (of course I make sure I'm not standing in a tub of water), and sometimes I didn't turn off the power, but that was when I was younger and bolder.
I'm happy to report that in the past 20 years I have never been shocked or electrocuted. Before that, it's a different story.
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Here are a few simple tips to help you:
1) Learn where your circuit breaker switch is, and know which switch does each outlet.
2) You can purchase a simple fluke, greenly, etc... conductivity meter to use for checking for voltage without having to touch or open wires. These "wands" run on typically AAA batteries and a light will turn on in them if they are next to live conductors.
3) If it is safe to access the wires / terminals you can use a volt meter (ac) to check for 120Vac on your line. Ensure your meter can handle upto 120Vac. Place one meter lead on your hot (typically black), and the other lead on neutral (typically white).
Of course if your dealing with a multi-phase system you can run each phase with a common neautral wire. This has not been my experience in residential systems; however, I've not experienced every situation yet.
JW
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Here are a few simple tips to help you:
1) Learn where your circuit breaker switch is, and know which switch does each outlet.
2) You can purchase a simple fluke, greenly, etc... conductivity meter to use for checking for voltage without having to touch or open wires. These "wands" run on typically AAA batteries and a light will turn on in them if they are next to live conductors.
3) If it is safe to access the wires / terminals you can use a volt meter (ac) to check for 120Vac on your line. Ensure your meter can handle upto 120Vac. Place one meter lead on your hot (typically black), and the other lead on neutral (typically white).
Of course if your dealing with a multi-phase system you can run each phase with a common neautral wire. This has not been my experience in residential systems; however, I've not experienced every situation yet.
JW
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Here are a few simple tips to help you:
1) Learn where your circuit breaker switch is, and know which switch does each outlet.
2) You can purchase a simple fluke, greenly, etc... conductivity meter to use for checking for voltage without having to touch or open wires. These "wands" run on typically AAA batteries and a light will turn on in them if they are next to live conductors.
3) If it is safe to access the wires / terminals you can use a volt meter (ac) to check for 120Vac on your line. Ensure your meter can handle upto 120Vac. Place one meter lead on your hot (typically black), and the other lead on neutral (typically white).
Of course if your dealing with a multi-phase system you can run each phase with a common neautral wire. This has not been my experience in residential systems; however, I've not experienced every situation yet.
JW
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