How do I fix cast iron waste stack crack?


My sewer stack has a hairline crack in the bell hub right at the concrete floor in my basement. I'm afraid the only way to fix it is to bust out the floor around it and replace it, But I was hoping for some suggestions for an epoxy or resin, or something that I could do to fix the seeping crack. I'm wondering if I could build up some mortar or something around it to try to seal the leak. It is about an inch above the floor. Anyone have any ideas?
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On Aug 22, 12:59 pm, johnnylabguy_at_yahoo_dot snipped-for-privacy@foo.com (johnnylabguy) wrote:

fabrics which makes repair stronger than original material. I guess for the crack, I'd use fast curing epoxy as you want it clean and dry to start. Then for the wrap I'd use the slower curing epoxy to give myself longer work time. I happened to have the aforementioned fabrics but you could buy glass.
With mortar, leak would probably seep through as it does mud in a shower pan. Epoxy would seal it and since there is no pressure should be permanent if crack does not widen which is why I would wrap with strong, cured material.
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On Sat, 22 Aug 2009 16:59:00 +0000, johnnylabguy_at_yahoo_dot snipped-for-privacy@foo.com (johnnylabguy) wrote:

BTDT. I used a large stainless steel band clamp similar to a radiator hose clamp, but muck larger. I think it got it when Rickel was still in business. It squeezed the cast iron hub just enough to close the crack.
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If you have a buddy who has welding equipment, ask him to weld it. Cast iron can be welded.
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wrote:

Don't even bother THINKING about it.
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There are several epoxy repair wraps for copper water piping that is under pressure and they work quite well. I wouldn't hesitate to use them on your non pressured sanitary pipe.
Here is an example: http://www.epoxyproducts.com/pipewrap2.html
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johnnylabguy had written this in response to http://www.thestuccocompany.com/maintenance/Re-How-do-I-fix-cast-iron-waste-stack-crack-390661-.htm : Thanks for all the replies. I tried to epoxy the crack this weekend and unfortunately I've discovered the hairline crack appears to go below the concrete level. I guess there will be no shortcut for this repair.
Also thanks for the info on stuccosite... I was just searching for similar topics with msn and stuccosite was third on the list so the spammers are getting smarter. But you know, I can deal with a few ads if it means me finding an answer faster. Next time I'll go through usenet but for now it looks like I've got more important things to do like busting out some concrete and replacing some cast iron. Not fun.
DanG wrote:

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And not the best solution. Better is to cut out the bad iron and replace it with PVC, connected with rubber adapters and pipe clamps. Iron is so last century.
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