House Painting Questions

I have a small house, with 500 to 1000 square feet of wood panel requiring painting.
Do people recommend buying a sprayer for this job? (I own a 100+ psi air compressor, if this helps.) If so, what brand do you recommend? Can I get away with one of those roughly $100 sprayers at Lowe's and Home Depot?
What paint is needed? Please feel free to list specific brands. I'll pay more for a higher quality look.
What sort of surface preparation is appropriate? The unfinished wood is starting to show through in some places.
I will be googling for more info on the subject but would appreciate _any_ suggestions.
TIA
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Those cheapy sprayers might be OK for hobby projects but not exterior house painting. If you insist on spraying then rent professional equipment.
For 500-1000 sq ft I'd recommend a brush or roller. Spraying looks easy but it's takes lots of experience and professional technique to apply a consistent film thickness and to the thickness level recommended by the paint manufacturer. As a spraying newbie, it might look OK initially but it won't after a couple years. A good compromise is to use a sprayer to apply the paint and then backbrush or backroll it.
You also need to keep in mind that sprayers involve lots of overhead. There's setup, masking everything in sight, and cleaning the equipment at the end of the job. (and everything needs to be masked when you spray including drift going to the neighbors!!)
Preperation is extremely important. You absolutely need to have a good clean substrate. (ie no dirt, mildew, chaulk, or peeling paint). You also need to do caulking and priming where necessary.
I like SW Duration. It's expensive but it's one coat, self priming, and has a lifetime guarantee. Avoid homecenter paint sold at places like Kmart an Home Crapo. Go to a real paint store where the pro's shop.
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Spend time on the prep work. A good Powerwash and scrapping will make a difference in the end results.
Also, buy the good Caulk (GE xrt caulk @HD) and fill in the seams where needed.
I agree 100% with buying good paint (say away from HD, Menards, Kmart). I've had good results with Murello but prep is essential. Can't go wrong with Benjam Moore either.
kubie
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I painted the interior of a house with an airless sprayer and it took a lot more time to do all the masking etc. than it would have taken to use brushes and rollers. I also spent a lot of time cleaning paint specks from windows and fixtures that were in another room. The sprayer kept clogging and the instructions didn't even tell me it had a filter in the hose.
OTOH I made a sprayer for latex out of a peanut butter jar and a compressor blower. Your basic atomizer design. I have to thin the paint some (25-30% water) to get it to spray but it only requires a small compressor and is extremely simple to clean. I use it to paint under the eaves, wood swingsets, picnic tables, fences etc. I even painted roof turbines with it. They still looked great after several years. It would probably do a good job on siding if care is taken to avoid runs and it would be very easy to use for stucco. I have several of the same (plastic) jars and if some paint is left over you just unscrew it and put a lid on it and use the other jar on the sprayer.
Always buy the more expensive paint unless you really enjoy repainting every few years.

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Elle wrote:

My experiance with sprayers is that they are messy and you need to go over it with a brush anyhow. 1000sq is not a big job with a brush - unless it is a very rough siding - then i'd use the sprayer.

Pending what is on it now I would go with Benj. Moore primer and 100% flat acrylic. I live near the ocean with lots of wind, salt and moisture and never have a problem with this brand.

Cleaning is a must. If you use a pressure washer i'd wait a few weeks after as it drives the water into the wood and over time it has to escape - unfortunately through your new paint causing bubbles. Sand and prime. Fill gaps with a good latex painters caulking. Replace any rot.

I would go to you local reputable paint dealership and speak to a knowledgable paint sales person as a first step.

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in work. But to honest for 500 t0 1000 sq ft job you would save money hiring somebody by the time you rent equipment, plus sounds like this would be a new experience for you so it might be better to paint the neighbors house for practice.Your not talking about a big job so you could roll it even if you spray you still need to back roll it. As for paint I use Kelly Moore as mentioned most the paints I've used from home crapo and lowes are best left on the shelf.
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....

The verb "back roll" -- what's that?
Thanks,
David
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No, most are crappy. The Wanger sprayer is really JUNK

I've had excellent results with Pittsburgh Manor Home. Goes on easily and last for years.

Scrape well, prime the bare spots.
--
Ed
http://pages.cthome.net/edhome/




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Dave, Kubie, Ulysses, Sacramento, robson, and Ed,
Thank you very much for sharing your specific experiences. I read all your posts and put them in my notes. This seems to me a very good start.
I'll go with the brush and rollers, high quality paints at real paint stores (or whoever sells some of the brands you all suggested), will start researching power washing, and get on top of caulking. The wood siding is kind of rough, but from some touch-up spots I painted a few years ago, and with enough diligence, I think I'll be okay with the brush and rollers.
This is indeed a "new experience" for me, but I just can't see hiring someone to do this when I have the time and wherewithal. I prefer to give my money to charities...
I figure if I mess up this time, it will be better next time.
Much obliged,
Elle
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As an 8 year old playing sandlot football with some 12 year olds I was asked to go out and turn right for a pass. Told the "quarterback" I'd never done that and his response was "You can't learn any younger!" and I've never forgotten. Love that philosophy! Experience teaches.
On Wed, 17 Aug 2005 16:35:51 GMT, "Elle"

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Elle, Good luck with the project!!
Motivation to do the best quality job will make up for your lack of inexperience. There's no question that you can do a job as good as a pro, however it might take you 2-3X the time.
Be very careful about any powerwashing on wood. You can destroy wood with high pressure washing and/or drive water deep into the inner walls where it could ruin insulation and cause mildew/rot problems. For wood siding cleaning prep, I prefer using Jomax, bleach, and water in a low pressure pump up garden sprayer. Spray it on, wait, and rinse it off with a garden hose. If there are stubborn areas use a long handled car wash brush. Let it dry for several days before painting. It won't harm nearby vegitation if used according to the Jomax bottle directions.
Another tip is to always try and paint in the shade and not on a hot surface.
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Bob, good anecdote.
Dave, what you say about the powerwashing makes sense. I'll devise a much lower pressure method.
I don't have any large shade trees around my house as yet, so I'll shoot for morning painting.
I figure it will indeed take me longer, but I have the time. It will be a good athletic workout. And I'm sure I'll love the improved look of the house.

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Re: no shade: Just let the sun chase you around the house. Start on the southern or western exposure while early in the AM - after the dew is gone from the siding. Then, move counter-clockwise around the compass and you should be ahead of the sun. If it catches you by noon, move to the north side which should get little if any sun. Also, regarding caulk, I have found the 100% silicone varieties to hold up much better than the combo latex/ silicone. Unfortunately, these are not paintable. The saving grace, perhaps in your case, is that it is available in white, almond and dark brown - also, concrete gray, so one of these may work for you. Remember, at the distances that people will be observing it only has to be a similar color. If you can't compromise here you will indeed have to paint. Best of luck. Having done it both ways I would go back to doing it myself in a heartbeat becaus I do a far better job than the so-called pros and if I can so can you!! Be careful and don't worry about time.
wrote

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Elle wrote:

I've never painted an entire exterior, just this and that outdoors, and lots of interior. The advice has been good...fall is a good time for painting, as you want to have dry weather and not too cold or hot.
As for caulk, be sure to get a paintable caulk (the tube will have indications for use for the specific area), which you want to get done after washing.
Proper prep and good brand paint make all the difference. Pick your paint brand and check out the company's website for trouble spots and general direction. The fine print on the label is there for a good reason :o)
Use blue painter's tape, not brown masking tape, and take it off as soon as you are finished painting. Don't paint above sidewalks or patios without a tarp, because drips and spills are about impossible to get out of concrete.
If you have small areas where a sprayer would work better, there is a little aerosol sprayer available, with air refills, but they are very small. Work like a charm on louvers, etc. Mailbox? Turned railings? Preval makes them. You use your own paint, fill the jar, add stuff per the instructions to thin paint. They have a small spray area, so are easy to control. Use a small foam brush to catch drips and runs.
Always mix paint immediately before use, even though they put it in the shaker at the paint store. Mix the next can of paint with part of the paint from the previous so's if there is a color difference it will be less noticeable.
Buy good quality brushes and take care of them; they will last as long as you do :o)
Old pantyhose are great for tying around shrubs to keep them away from the paint. :o) Enjoy :o)
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Prior to dipping the brush into the paint/finish precondition it with the proper solvent, thinner for oil based and water for latex. Get the bristles wet up to the ferrule. Stops the paint from drying inside the brush making it stiffer and makes cleaning MUCH easier.
wrote:

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My house is ided, but I did the shutters and trim this year. I stayed in the shade because hot sun is not the best for the paint or the painter.

Great tip. If your friends happen to catch you guys wearing panty hose, you just tell them you are getting ready to paint the house.
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