Hot water problem

Puzzle - can anyone shed light on this? We have no problem with the hot water in the house except in the bathroom furthest from the hot water heater, and then only in the tub and not the handbasin. Anytime hot water is turned on in the tub, the water runs black then finally clears. Since it is the guest bathroom, it is something I'd like to solve. Any thoughts, anyone?
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limey at toad dot net
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limey wrote:

Black water usually means a rubber faucet washer deteriorating. But it might also be caused by corrosion of a galv iron nipple in the supply or in the tub spout connection to the faucet.
Jim
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It can also be caused by a trace amount or more of sulfur (H2S gas) in the water. The tub being used less frequently than other fixtures and usually with the best flow rate will allow precipitation of the H2S to cling to the inside of the tubing and then break loose from time to time as the water is used.
Gary Quality Water Associates
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"Gary Slusser" wrote in message >

Yes, we have quite a bit of sulfur in the water. I have to drain the HW tank every once in a while because of the odor. Also, when I run the hot water in the bathroom in question, I don't get the sediment until the water actually gets hot. I drained the HW tank this morning, then also got the sediment in the jacuzzi in the room next to the tank. Is there a solution, other than a whole water treatment system? Thanks for your reply.
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Actually it sounds as if you have a hot water only odor, that can be caused by a trace of H2S in the cold but.... if there is none, then you have a sulfate or other reducing bacteria problem and must kill them before they get to the heater tank. Or, remove the anode rod or replace it with other than a magnesium type but if you drop any of the old one into the tank as you remove it - it's like ya didn't remove any of it and you can't get pieces out of the bottom of the tank. Or, raise the temp of the heater to 140f. Anode rods can be like real difficult to loosen - the key is holding the tank from rotating. lol.
You can ad about a half gallon of bleach to the heater, draw chlorinated water to all hot water fixtures and let it sit 10 minutes and turn them on for a count of ten and wait 10 minutes and repeat for an hour. Then let sit for as long as possible or at least a few hours and then drain (with the power/fuel off) and flush the tank with cold water until the last water out of the drain is as clear as you can get it. This can take many times of flushing with about 30 seconds of cold water each time. That's enough chlorine to burn eyes and bleach spots on clothes so no hot water use until you're done and refilled with clean water.
No, no other way than treatment equipment if you do have cold water H2S. It is easily treated and it isn't very expensive. Most will talk to you about some bleach down the well. That usually doesn't work if your H2S is naturally occurring, it can if the problem is reducing type bacteria in the well but problem is, they're in the 'aquifer too and you can't reach there with bleach alone. Chlorine raises the pH of the water and chlorine is only a good disinfectant at a pH of 7.2. and lower to about 5.2. Plus shocking a well can cause serious water quality and pump/plumbing. Also, shocking usually makes a bacteria caused problem worse.
Gary Quality Water Associates
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"Gary Slusser" wrote
limey wrote:

iron. We had the odor problem for years with the previous water heater and I would put bleach in there to kill the odor; that would take care of it for quite a while. Removing the anode would be quite a job, since the builder put a row of cabinets on that wall and one sits squarely on top of the heater (with cut-outs to accommodate the pipes). Looks like I need to discuss a water treatment system with some local company. I agree - I don't want to shock the well.
Thanks again, Gary - you have given me great advice.
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You sound handy enough to install something yourself. If you want a quote and to maybe save hundreds, my email works.
Gary Quality Water Associates
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When dealing with a delay in getting hot water, check out www.RedyTemp.com they have a downloadable market analysis which shows all the different hot water recirculators available. They also explain the problems with most. Only the RedyTemp hot water recirculator has answered the many problems apparent with most others. Installation, hard water calcium buildup were the biggest problems until the RedyTemp came out. These things really do work otherwise the water companies wouldn't be given rebates for people who install them in their home. The RedyTemps is so easy to install and uninstall, you can take it with you if you move. We love ours.
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"Speedy Jim" wrote in message

Everything is new after our house was totally lost in a fire. There are no galv iron nipples in the system.
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