Hot tub electrical question

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lity and difficulty (or ease) of this proposition before making a choice on a new hot tub.

reaker in the breaker box, and another breaker and cut-off switch outside o n the side of the house in a separate box - about 10' from the tub. This w as done about 5 years ago, so the wiring is pretty new. The tub itself was older and used when we got it, but the price was right (free - plus the co st for moving and wiring). It served us well, but gave up the ghost last y ear. Now we're looking for a replacement and have been looking at smaller hot tubs. Most of them seem to be of the 110V "Plug-n-play" variety, thoug h they say they do require a 15amp dedicated circuit.

thing to convert this circuit to be a 110V, 15 amp circuit? Basically as s imple as putting in new breakers of the appropriate amperage, and adding a receptacle to the end of the wire (previously it was wired directly into th e tub)?
It is doable, but let the electrician make the determination.
The 15 amp plug-in type hot tubs operate a little differently than what you had. Because of the small power supply, the hot tub will only heat water when it is not in use. When you have the jets blowing bubbles, the heater will not operate. This is fine if you don't use the tub for extended perio ds where the water would cool down while you are in it.
John Grabowski http://www.MrElectrician.TV
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In alt.home.repair, on Mon, 5 Oct 2015 13:14:12 -0700 (PDT), John G

When I'm in the bathtub for even 30 minutes, either the water cools off or it just feels like it has because I've gotten used to it. I have to keep adding a trickle of hot water.
I was going to measure the temperature to see if it's what changes but I haven't yet.

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On 10/5/2015 10:16 PM, micky wrote:

Probably some of both. Large surface area to give up heat, plus the tub itself is a big heat sink, but you do get used to the temperature.
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On Monday, October 5, 2015 at 4:14:21 PM UTC-4,

r when it is not in use. When you have the jets blowing bubbles, the heate r will not operate. This is fine if you don't use the tub for extended per iods where the water would cool down while you are in it.

+1
My first spa, I made that mistake too. When I found out the disadvantages it was still new, so I got the company to switch out the controller pack for a 240V one.
To summarize, there are two issues: First is what John pointed out, that the heater will not heat while the pump is on high and the blower is going. That may not be so bad, because usually you're not going to be in it long enough for the water to cool down much. But it does mean that whatever temp it's at when you get in, it's only going down.
Second is what GFRE pointed out, that at 240V it will heat at 4X the rate as 120V. To me, that makes a big difference, especially in one that is outside. I keep mine at the lowest temp, 50F, which obviously saves a lot of energy in the winter. When I'm going to use it, I turn it up. It still takes a few hours to get to 100F. It would take 4x that with 120V, meaning you'd have to plan a long way in advance. Or you could keep it on a timer, but I don't use mine that regularly.
Another factor is from what I've seen, the 120V ones are limited to very small ones. I think if you're getting one, it doesn't cost all that much more to get a bigger/better one.
If he really wants 120V, then converting that circuit over isn't a big deal.
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After the 220v/50A hot tub, you will be very disappointed in the 110V models. They are very wimpy. Since you already have the wiring, I suggest sticking with the 220v models.
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Thanks for all the replies. It'll take me a while to look through them all , but I got the answer I was hoping for pretty quick. So thanks. I love t his group!
Some of the hot tubs I was looking at that come as 120v plug-n-play can als o be purchased as 240v (hard-wiring required, with a more powerful heater a nd maybe some other additions - for an extra price). Other tubs appear to be sold as 120v only. My personal preference is to pay the extra $$ for a 240 model, but I did not want to be constrained when looking at tub, so it' s nice to know that the wiring should be simple for an electrician.
As for converting a 120v to run on 240v, I guess you could do it if you mad e sure all the components could handle that, but I wouldn't want to risk it . For the tubs that I was looking at that come in both flavors, they often say that you if you have the 240v model, you can easily rewire it to run o n 120v (but clearly, if you did that, you wouldn't be making use of the bee fed up heater element that you payed extra for). However, the reverse is g enerally not true; you can't convert the 120v model to run on 240 - at leas t that's what the manual says.
Cheers.
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On Tuesday, October 6, 2015 at 12:25:54 PM UTC-4, J wrote:

this group!

and maybe some other additions - for an extra price). Other tubs appear t o be sold as 120v only. My personal preference is to pay the extra $$ for a 240 model, but I did not want to be constrained when looking at tub, so i t's nice to know that the wiring should be simple for an electrician.

it. For the tubs that I was looking at that come in both flavors, they oft en say that you if you have the 240v model, you can easily rewire it to run on 120v (but clearly, if you did that, you wouldn't be making use of the b eefed up heater element that you payed extra for). However, the reverse is generally not true; you can't convert the 120v model to run on 240 - at le ast that's what the manual says.

I'm not sure there is actually a beefed up heater element at all. I think it's the same element, they just put 240V across it instead of 120V. It's fully surrounded in moving water, the temp rises across it's not much.
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