Hot Tub 220 volt question

I am in the process of purchasing a hot tub, I have never owned one before, but we feel that it will be very throputic for my back.
Anyway the question is: This hot tub requires a 220 hook up, is this hard to do, I have wired up 110 before, whats the differance, and how about cost? If I was to have someone come out and do it what should it cost. Oh I guess a little house background would help, it is a modular home with a cement slab with plenty of crawel space in fact you can get on a creeper and almost go from one end to the other, so under the house is not a big thing.
Anyone know any web pages that have wiring info on hooking up a new 220 line in the circuit breaker box?
Thanks all Bill
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240v is pretty much the same as 120v except there are two hots. This question comes up weekly; do a search.
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Bill Becker wrote:

It's not much harder at all than 110v, and normally it's not any more expensive. But a hot tub is a special case, and it needs a GFCI (and 220v GFCI's are *expensive*), and I'm not sure but I think it needs a disconnect located 5 to 10 feet away. I know it also should have a GFCI protected 110v convenience outlet at least 5 but not more than 10 feet away from the tub.
You need to know what amperage 220v circuit you need. The breaker and the wire are sized to match the load. Thirty amps, for instance, should have a 30A 2-pole breaker and #10 copper wire. 40A gets #8 copper, and 50A or 60A gets #6 copper or #4 (or #3) aluminum. 100A is (I think) #4 copper or #2 aluminum. If the tub has electric heat, you're supposed to derate the wire 20%, which generally means use one size larger. Maybe you don't have to do this with 90 degree (celcius) rated wire -- it's never been an issue with anything I've done.
Even with a GFCI, grounding is very important for this application. You need to read Article 680 of the electric code. If you're not familiar with electrical wiring, a hot tub or pool or spa is not really a good place to start.
Best regards, Bob
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No, indeed... A very bad place to start. If he needs to ask about how to make a 240V circuit, and doesn't know about GFCIs, he shouldn't be doing it.
I suggest he hire an electrician.
To reduce the cost, when he has the electrician out to estimate the job, the OP should ask what things he could do to finesse the price.
Ie: maybe the electrician would be amenible to having the OP physically installing the various boxes, drilling the requisite holes, and buying/laying the feeder cable. But not connecting anything. Cable left outside of boxes.
Electrician pops in and spends an hour connecting everything, done.
If access from the panel to spa is short/easy, it'll probably make little difference. But if it's an awkward routing, having the OP drill/lay the feeder could save hours of labor.
As long as he's following careful instructions.. (ie: hole locations).
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
It's not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
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I don't think an additional disconnect is required other than the main switch typically located within the hottub itself. At least not on single-family dwellings.
"Added for the 1999 Code, Section 680-38 requires a local disconnecting device for spas and hot tubs that is capable of being used in an emergency. This requirement was added to address entrapment hazards associated with spas and hot tubs. A definitive publication on this issue entitled Guideline for Entrapment Hazards: Making Pools and Spas Safer (Publication Number 363) is available from the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, Washington, D.C. 20207. Accordingly, the emergency shutoff switch must be installed within sight of and at least 5 ft from the spa or hot tub. This shutoff switch must be clearly labeled as an "Emergency Shutoff." See Figure 680.17 for an illustration of the switch location. The shutoff switch can be either a line-operated device or a remote-controlled circuit that causes the pump circuit to open. This requirement does not apply to one-family dwellings."
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HA HA Budys Here wrote:

Thank-you. I *thought* there was a requirement for a disconnect, but I couldn't find it in my 1993 code book. (A cheap air conditioner pullout disconnect would work, or if the spa had a cord-and-plug that would be good enough.
Best regards, Bob
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You can read here:
http://www.homewiringandmore.com/homewiringusa/2002/accessory/hottub/hottub.html
As other have said, this is an intermediate level job. You'll probably need wire with a green insulated (not just covered) neutral, which means using conduit and individual wires.
-- Mark Kent, WA
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