Hot Tar/Gravel Alternative For Low Slope Roofs?

I realize this may vary by jurisdiction. Are there any generally acceptable ways to cover a low slope (say 1 in 15) roof other than the traditional hot tar and gravel? I ask because one local building inspector says there are none, yet several licensed roofers claim their methods (tar paper covered by a rubber-like layer about .25" thick, bonded to a black gooey substance, applied like paste, with a portable gas heater) do meet local building codes.
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CWLee
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CWLee wrote: I realize this may vary by jurisdiction. Are there any generally acceptable ways to cover a low slope (say 1 in 15) roof other than the traditional hot tar and gravel? I ask because one local building inspector says there are none, yet several licensed roofers claim their methods (tar paper covered by a rubber-like layer about .25" thick, bonded to a black gooey substance, applied like paste, with a portable gas heater) do meet local building codes
Well, most low pitch roofing materials are just glorified tar. Read: "bitumin". The torch-down does a nice job, just a little scary in tight places! It's applied over a fibreglass membrane that's nailed very securely to the decking with cap nails. You have another alternative in the "peel and stick" type membranes. Much thinner(and cheaper) than torch-down, comes aluminized, black or white. Maybe even tan. You must coat these(unless they're mineralized or aluminized), with some type of sealant to increase their lifespan. There's also "rubberoid", or EPDM, that's applied with a type of rubber cement. Don't inhale too much while applying. This stuff can come in really big sheets, making for quick work. Oh, I almost forgot about flat seamed copper! Nice.....Tom
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This is Turtle.
Yes, i do know about the New Coating tar roofing material is all about and called Roll Roofing.
There is two types of what you are speaking of here and is called Roll Roofing .
first the type that your speaking of is the poor version but still holds up for maybe 10 years or so. It is a material that is tared together with tar at each seam to connect the 42" X 50' rolls. The Tar is applied to connect the seams and is the very poor version of the stuff. In 10 years or so you will be re taring the seams over again when they bust. There is NO torch needed to put the Tar type roll roofing down but just the bucket of tar and broom. this method is just about the same as rocks and tar roofs and could be a little less effective or duriable.
Second version is the Burn on Roll roofing and one brand name in this material is Brier Roll Roofing. this Burn on roll roofing is laid down and the seams are burned and melted together at all the seams. this stuff will bond the seams forever. It comes with a 50 year warranty for it breaking down. this would be the only stuff to use for when you put it down right, it there for ever. I have it on my carport put down in 1983 and still holding up good. I have had only 2 leaks and both were cause by tree limbs poking holes in it and i just got some more burn roll roofing and patched it by burning a patch to cover the hole.
What you have described here is the cheap version and not all that good if you have the seams connected by tar, use a asphalt tape, and not just burnt together. If you don't BURN the connection of the seams together and don't apply nothing at the seams but burning the seams. You don't have the good stuff. The Good stuff only has to be burned together and nothing else. There is bunches of want a bees to Brier Roll Roofing and if you don't get the burn on , just forget it.
TURTLE
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The answer is yes, but we didnt use the rubber approach - just standard hot tar cemented roofing.We have a 1 7/8 inch per foot of pitch, too low for shingles. 8 years ago we had a five layer system put on, of high quality. First some kind lapped fiberglass blanket, then three plys of mineral felt, each applied with full coverage hot tar, followed by a mineral-surfaced colored capsheet, also hot-tarred to the underlying 3-ply felt. Highly walkable, waterproof, and not as unsightly as some tar and gravel roofs, which do not take foot traffic as well.
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Yes, we just has it done at work. I don't have the details here, but can get them next week. It was laid on hot tar and looks good and seems to work well.
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< single ply roof > brought up a number of manufactureres. There are lots of variations: mechanical fastened, glue down, torched.
Check with local building official for code requirements, then aske manufacturere or contractor for system that meets those requirements.
TB
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