Hot on Left, Cold on Right?

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Do it right. I have two examples of why from personal experience.
1. Me and wife lived with parents for a short time after we moved. He had washing machine on back porch that needed draining every use in cold weather. Connections backward and I hooked it up one morning by convention. Ruined an entire load of my wife's uniforms that required the delicate setting.
2. Did a basement replumb replacing all pipes. Somehow I got the laundry tub ones backward. "I'm the only one who usese, I'll remember"...nope - after almost burning myself twice when expecting cold water I redid it by crossing the pipes coming from the ceiling (too cramped up there to reverse them right).
Harry K
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wrote:

Thanks for all the replies. I'll cross the copper lines to keep the "hot on left, cold on right" standard.
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wrote:

That IS the north american standard. Many places in Europe it is reversed - and in Africa some places it's one way, other places the other.
When I was in Zambia in the 70s it was hard to know which was which in the hot season, what with exposed plumbing on the outside of masonry walls!!!!!! BOTH taps gave hot water, even with the geiser shut down. (City water flowed to a gravity tank up among the rafters under the tin roof, and from there down the sunny wall to the kitchen and bath)
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deal. Sometimes the little things do matter.
Don Young
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It applies to all plumbing, but really, it's not that big of a deal. If properly marked, it should not be an issue. You can buy red and blue hose bibb handles at the hardware store. Washing machines get hooked up once every 15 years or so, it's not like you're making hose connections there every day.
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Yeah same in some Gulf states. No freezing temps of course. Low pressure mains water was accumulated from the street mains in a big tank at ground level in the yard. Then another pump raised that to another tank on the roof. Both tanks although painted white were out in the open with the sun beating on them. Identical systems for each living unit. By February too hot to walk across the tiled yard in bare feet by 11.00 AM; so you can imagine how hot the 'cold' water was. Sewage was frequently not piped away to a treatment plant; in many compounds it was accumulated in large underground tanks. Then a large tanker, typically with two Honda type pumps mounted at the back would come and suck it up, which took some time and could be quite odorous on a hot day! The pumping operation often occurred twice a week about 50 feet from some one's front door
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