Homemade peanut butter

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I've made nut butters in the kitchen for many years, usually peanut butter. It's a money saver and you can see with your own eyes exactly what the ingredients are.
I roast the nuts in the oven, although I have made raw cashew butter a time or two. My sometime problem is getting a machine that's up to the task. I used to work with a Waring blender, and after burning out a few motors (they were available for user replacement), I bought an Osterizer 10 speed and it lasted for over 20 years on the original motor. It finally burned out about two months ago. This old Osterizer was 125 watts only. Besides the glass blender jar I had a $10 plastic accessory that they called a food processor attachment, which I have only used for grinding meat on occasion. It's designed very well and does a very nice job of meat grinding.
So, in looking for a replacement for my old Osterizer I figured I'd get another Osterizer, naturally, inasmuch as the old one lasted 20+ years and I still wanted to be able to use the meat-grinding food processor attachment. I did some homework and found that the current Osterizer blenders are rated at much higher power -- from 450 watts up to 600 watts or so. About two months ago I picked up a #6694 450 watt 12 speed Osterizer Blender at Walmart for around $25. However, it burned out this morning making a new batch of peanut butter. I suppose I can get a warranty replacement which will work fine for smoothies and such and grinding meat, but evidently I need something more robust for nut butters. I had been eyeing the "Beehive" Osterizer, which I can get for around $55 at Walmart. It's supposed to be 600 watts, supports 2 speeds and a flash button (the food processor attachment requires flash). I thought I'd post first to get people's opinions and experience before shelling out more money, perhaps vainly.
Dan
Email: dmusicant at pacbell dot net
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( snipped-for-privacy@privacy.net) says...

Have you looked into the thunderstick? http://www.asseenontv.com/prod-pages/thunderstick.html
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wrote:
:( snipped-for-privacy@privacy.net) says... :> I've made nut butters in the kitchen for many years, usually peanut :> butter. It's a money saver and you can see with your own eyes exactly :> what the ingredients are. :> :> I roast the nuts in the oven, although I have made raw cashew butter a :> time or two. My sometime problem is getting a machine that's up to the :> task. I used to work with a Waring blender, and after burning out a few :> motors (they were available for user replacement), I bought an Osterizer :> 10 speed and it lasted for over 20 years on the original motor. It :> finally burned out about two months ago. This old Osterizer was 125 :> watts only. Besides the glass blender jar I had a $10 plastic accessory :> that they called a food processor attachment, which I have only used for :> grinding meat on occasion. It's designed very well and does a very nice :> job of meat grinding. :> :> So, in looking for a replacement for my old Osterizer I figured I'd get :> another Osterizer, naturally, inasmuch as the old one lasted 20+ years :> and I still wanted to be able to use the meat-grinding food processor :> attachment. I did some homework and found that the current Osterizer :> blenders are rated at much higher power -- from 450 watts up to 600 :> watts or so. About two months ago I picked up a #6694 450 watt 12 speed :> Osterizer Blender at Walmart for around $25. However, it burned out this :> morning making a new batch of peanut butter. I suppose I can get a :> warranty replacement which will work fine for smoothies and such and :> grinding meat, but evidently I need something more robust for nut :> butters. I had been eyeing the "Beehive" Osterizer, which I can get for :> around $55 at Walmart. It's supposed to be 600 watts, supports 2 speeds :> and a flash button (the food processor attachment requires flash). I :> thought I'd post first to get people's opinions and experience before :> shelling out more money, perhaps vainly. :> :> Dan :> :> Email: dmusicant at pacbell dot net :> :Have you looked into the thunderstick? :http://www.asseenontv.com/prod-pages/thunderstick.html
I'd never seen it. It's not available at that site currently and they don't post a price. Seems unlikely that I could make up to 60 ounces of smooth peanut butter with any convenience with that item. The pictures at that site are tiny and I can't make out what the accessories come to, but it doesn't look promising.
Dan
Email: dmusicant at pacbell dot net
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( snipped-for-privacy@privacy.net) says...

somtimes they have these products at cvs or walgreens
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I've used a Cuisinart food processor with good results. I've not made all that much nut butter compared to you, but it has worked and may be worth considering. Plenty of people have them so you may find a friend that will let you try theirs for a batch to see the results.
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

So, now, how about a recipe please? Is it just ground peanuts or do you add something?
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Peanuts, maybe a few drops of vegetable oil, and some salt. Turn on the machine and let it rip. add tiny amounts oil if you want a thinner consistency, salt to taste.
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Thank you. I shall try that:)
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wrote:
:Ed Pawlowski wrote:
:> :>> I've made nut butters in the kitchen for many years, usually peanut :>> butter. It's a money saver and you can see with your own eyes exactly :>> what the ingredients are. :>> :>> I roast the nuts in the oven, although I have made raw cashew butter :>> a time or two. My sometime problem is getting a machine that's up to :>> the task. I used to work with a Waring blender, and after burning :>> out a few motors (they were available for user replacement), I :> :> I've used a Cuisinart food processor with good results. I've not :> made all that much nut butter compared to you, but it has worked and :> may be worth considering. Plenty of people have them so you may :> find a friend that will let you try theirs for a batch to see the :> results. : :So, now, how about a recipe please? Is it just ground peanuts or do you add :something?
Sure. Ingredients:
60 ounces raw peanuts 1 teaspoon salt
Lately, I make enough to fill two 28 oz. jars, so I use around 60 ounces of raw peanuts. Yesterday I bought almost 20 lb., raw peanuts in bulk at my local Chinatown for $0.99/lb.
I place 30 oz. of raw peanuts on a large flat aluminum cookie sheet that I've had for many years, and 30 oz. is as full as it will get with the nuts as close together as can be without being double stacked. I place this in a cold gas oven and then set the thermostat to 350. I set my digital timer for 30 minutes and when it goes off I turn off the oven but leave the nuts in there for part of the cool-down (this method takes a little longer, but it saves on gas). After the oven is below 250 it's OK to remove the sheet. I do this twice to get 60 oz. of roasted peanuts (a similar if not identical process can be used to roast almonds).
I was filling the blender container with 1/2 the nuts (30 oz.), along with about 1/2 teaspoon of salt. Salt to taste, but that's about the amount that I prefer.
I blend until smooth. I use a pestle from a mortar and pestle (I made the pestle some years ago from a cylindrical stick, but you could use a spoon, certainly) to push down the nuts for the first part of the grinding process, afterward stopping the motor occasionally and mixing and pushing down unground nuts with a butter knife (ordinary table knife). After a while the nut butter will actually swirl around in the container by itself. Remove with plastic spatula to a large mixing bowl from which I transfer into bottles. I keep one in the refrigerator, the other unrefrigerated for use.
Dan
Email: dmusicant at pacbell dot net
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Many thanks, Dan!
<saved>
Dan Musicant wrote:

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I second the Cuisinart food processor. I've got three, 11-cup, 6 cup, and mini-prep. All perform excellently for the tasks I use them for.
Be sure to hit the thrift shops and appliance repair places for the size you want. I was able to replace my broken lids (stupid "new-and-improved" design) with new units for cheaper than ordering a new part!
The Ranger
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:
: :> I've made nut butters in the kitchen for many years, usually peanut :> butter. It's a money saver and you can see with your own eyes exactly :> what the ingredients are. :> :> I roast the nuts in the oven, although I have made raw cashew butter a :> time or two. My sometime problem is getting a machine that's up to the :> task. I used to work with a Waring blender, and after burning out a few :> motors (they were available for user replacement), I : :I've used a Cuisinart food processor with good results. I've not made all :that much nut butter compared to you, but it has worked and may be worth :considering. Plenty of people have them so you may find a friend that will :let you try theirs for a batch to see the results.
Thanks. I think my sister may have one and I'll ask her.
Dan
Email: dmusicant at pacbell dot net
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Dan Musicant wrote:

Look at the offerings from a culinary supply house - the same stuff sold to institutional kitchens and the like.
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On Jun 26, 11:37am, Dan Musicant ( snipped-for-privacy@privacy.net) wrote:

Ive tried it in a blender but found a food processor works better. I made a batch of pecan butter the other day. If you like Oreintal peanut butter sauce you havent lived until you try it with pecan butter. Toasted sesame seeds are also a nice addition to most nut butters.
Jimmie
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On Fri, 26 Jun 2009 13:31:15 -0700 (PDT), JIMMIE
:On Jun 26, 11:37am, Dan Musicant ( snipped-for-privacy@privacy.net) wrote: :> I've made nut butters in the kitchen for many years, usually peanut :> butter. It's a money saver and you can see with your own eyes exactly :> what the ingredients are. :> :> I roast the nuts in the oven, although I have made raw cashew butter a :> time or two. My sometime problem is getting a machine that's up to the :> task. I used to work with a Waring blender, and after burning out a few :> motors (they were available for user replacement), I bought an Osterizer :> 10 speed and it lasted for over 20 years on the original motor. It :> finally burned out about two months ago. This old Osterizer was 125 :> watts only. Besides the glass blender jar I had a $10 plastic accessory :> that they called a food processor attachment, which I have only used for :> grinding meat on occasion. It's designed very well and does a very nice :> job of meat grinding. :> :> So, in looking for a replacement for my old Osterizer I figured I'd get :> another Osterizer, naturally, inasmuch as the old one lasted 20+ years :> and I still wanted to be able to use the meat-grinding food processor :> attachment. I did some homework and found that the current Osterizer :> blenders are rated at much higher power -- from 450 watts up to 600 :> watts or so. About two months ago I picked up a #6694 450 watt 12 speed :> Osterizer Blender at Walmart for around $25. However, it burned out this :> morning making a new batch of peanut butter. I suppose I can get a :> warranty replacement which will work fine for smoothies and such and :> grinding meat, but evidently I need something more robust for nut :> butters. I had been eyeing the "Beehive" Osterizer, which I can get for :> around $55 at Walmart. It's supposed to be 600 watts, supports 2 speeds :> and a flash button (the food processor attachment requires flash). I :> thought I'd post first to get people's opinions and experience before :> shelling out more money, perhaps vainly. :> :> Dan :> :> Email: dmusicant at pacbell dot net : :Ive tried it in a blender but found a food processor works better. I :made a batch of pecan butter the other day. If you like Oreintal :peanut butter sauce you :havent lived until you try it with pecan butter. Toasted sesame seeds :are also a nice addition to most nut butters. : :Jimmie
That sounds pretty good. Do you roast the pecans first?
Dan
PS Sesame oil might be good instead of the toasted sesame seeds, or possible both. Quality sesame oil is really good. In my experience it doesn't get rancid either.
Email: dmusicant at pacbell dot net
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We use the large Cuisinart. Make Sunflower butter. Chop almonds, Walnuts, Pecans also. No problem with Cuisinart. WW
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:
: :> I've made nut butters in the kitchen for many years, usually peanut :> butter. It's a money saver and you can see with your own eyes exactly :> what the ingredients are. :> :> I roast the nuts in the oven, although I have made raw cashew butter a :> time or two. My sometime problem is getting a machine that's up to the :> task. I used to work with a Waring blender, and after burning out a few :> motors (they were available for user replacement), I bought an Osterizer :> 10 speed and it lasted for over 20 years on the original motor. It :> finally burned out about two months ago. This old Osterizer was 125 :> watts only. Besides the glass blender jar I had a $10 plastic accessory :> that they called a food processor attachment, which I have only used for :> grinding meat on occasion. It's designed very well and does a very nice :> job of meat grinding. :> :> So, in looking for a replacement for my old Osterizer I figured I'd get :> another Osterizer, naturally, inasmuch as the old one lasted 20+ years :> and I still wanted to be able to use the meat-grinding food processor :> attachment. I did some homework and found that the current Osterizer :> blenders are rated at much higher power -- from 450 watts up to 600 :> watts or so. About two months ago I picked up a #6694 450 watt 12 speed :> Osterizer Blender at Walmart for around $25. However, it burned out this :> morning making a new batch of peanut butter. I suppose I can get a :> warranty replacement which will work fine for smoothies and such and :> grinding meat, but evidently I need something more robust for nut :> butters. I had been eyeing the "Beehive" Osterizer, which I can get for :> around $55 at Walmart. It's supposed to be 600 watts, supports 2 speeds :> and a flash button (the food processor attachment requires flash). I :> thought I'd post first to get people's opinions and experience before :> shelling out more money, perhaps vainly. :> :> Dan :> :> Email: dmusicant at pacbell dot net : :We use the large Cuisinart. Make Sunflower butter. Chop almonds, Walnuts, :Pecans also. No problem with Cuisinart. WW
Is that the 11 cup or the 14 cup? I was poking around online and looking at them today.
Dan
Email: dmusicant at pacbell dot net
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snipped-for-privacy@privacy.net wrote:

I've seen some interesting heavy-duty blenders used for Indian cooking. I can't remember any brand names, but they are like inexpensive versions of a Vita-Mix (with a 1/2 HP motor) Might be worth investigating.
You could also add peanut oil when you start so the PB is thinner, then let it settle and you can pour the oil back off the top when it separates.
I like PB made with salted redskin peanuts; I like the texture. :-P
Bob
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zxcvbob wrote:

Found one. I don't know if this is a good price or not: http://www.bombaylimited.com/Preethi-Mixie-Chef-Pro-Plus-16133.html
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zxcvbob wrote:

Another possibility is that some higher end grocery stores have peanut grinders in place for you to use. In my area a small franchise called "Papa Joe's" has one in each store. The large commercial type grinders, and plenty of fresh nuts for you to choose from. With the volume I eat peanut butter, I'd rather not pay $175 for another device that I'd have to find a place for.
Just an idea.
Bob
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