Home Depot Throws Away, But Won't Donate, Brand New Merchandise

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re: No paperwork, no recycling headaches, no tax lawer consultations.
Until Fred goes to get some free computers and Bob goes to get some free computers and Bob beats Fred over the head with a keyboard cuz Bob doesn't like to share and Fred gets a lawyer and the lawyer sues the hospital for creating the situation that prompted Bob to assault Fred.
They may not win, but you can bet your hard drive that there will be paperwork and lawyers and no more computers at the curb.
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I ASSume that someone removed or wiped the hard drives before doing so? Talk about liability problems!
nate
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You will also find that if an item is discarded there is no liability to them or the mfgr.. If it is donated or sold, liability is possible.
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Red Green wrote:

Yeah, you gotta be worried about what a soft sided tool bag could do to someone. They're an accident just waiting to happen.
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I know!
Charlie puts his lil' bro in the bag and zips it. Tosses in apt bldg trash chute as a ha-ha.
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wrote:

Many stores do the same. I used to work at a nation-wide retail store and we would cut unsold athletic shoes in half before throwing them into the dumpster. It is an expense to the store to donate, plus the person who picks up the goods may just sell the items at a much lower cost. My father owned a bakery and nuns would come by at the end of the day to pickup unsold goods for the convent. I doubt the nuns were selling doughnuts on the side, but if they did it was for a good cause.
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How is it only an expense when merchandise is donated and not an expense to spend time cutting up merchandise, which involves additional labor cost and then throwing it away?
plus

And surely there are similar charities available everywhere which can be vetted to ensure that they are legitimate and that the chance that donated goods aren't being diverted for personal profit. It would seem with all the homeless and needy a reasonable system could be worked out, if anyone cared to do so.
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One day I was looking for expensive 8ga 4 wire gen cable, i saw it at HD on sale, next day I went back to buy it. HD said they put it in the dumpster because it did not sell. They could have discounted it greater, it would have sold.
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On Wed, 10 Sep 2008 23:25:04 -0400, DerbyDad03 wrote:

And they would eventually be sold on eBay.
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Or returned to Home Depot for credit. Sears used to destroy stuff to prevent that. People even would shop the garage sales to find old broken Craftsman hand tools and then bring them into Sears for exchange. They started keeping a record of names and would refuse to deal with a person who obviously was doing that. Of course, they would just switch to another Sears store.
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Kuskokwim wrote:

And that would be a problem - how?
Let's see...
- Home Depot donates some Home Depot tool bags. Maybe they choose to take a write-off or maybe they just choose to feel good about themselves.
- My youth organization holds an event or a competition, and we give the bags to some teenagers. We feel good, the kids feel good.
- Some kid, either immediately or when (s)he's done with it, sells it on eBay. The kid feels good, the new owner feels good, Home Depot still has their name out there on the bag.
Who got hurt?
The other option is to throw the bags in the garbage so no one feels good and the landfill gets fuller.
What am I missing?
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Then their vendors cut them off for breach of contract.
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All that means is that the stupidity is more wide spread.
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Talk about waste... Last week I visited a friend who has three or four acres of garden out in the country. He grows most everything he needs foodwise and always has a surplus to share. This year was an unusually good one for potatoes and he wound up with about 2 tons of Kenebeck (sp.?) and Yukon Gold spuds. He called every service agency in the Yellow pages to see if their clients would want some of the bounty and was turned down flatly, hearing over and over, 'We only want money or canned goods.' The solution to the surplus could be to put the veggies in big boxes by the side of the road with a large sign, "FREE!" and see how many shiny SUV's stop to load up. Apparently the homeless and underprivileged aren't suffering all that much.
Joe
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re: The solution to the surplus could be to put the veggies in big boxes by the side of the road with a large sign, "FREE!" and see how many shiny SUV's stop to load up.
Pick a road in a poor neighborhood and you won't have to worry about the "shiny SUV's". (There may be shiny SUV's in the poor neighborhoods, but the drug dealers won't be stopping for free potatoes.)
re: Apparently the homeless and underprivileged aren't suffering all that much.
Oh, they're still suffereing, you just need to get around the roadblocks that the service agencies put up in order to see it.
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Again, liability concerns. What's to say he innocently donates these taters with every good intention and they turn out to be contaminated? Now you've got a bunch of sick/dead homeless people and/or their families, suing the service organization and your friend.
Canned goods have to go through FDA-approved processes to prevent contamination, and money can be used to purchase canned goods.
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Joe wrote:

He could have called here:
http://www.feedingamerica.org/how_to_help/donate_food /
And those John Edwards wannabes whose pictures appear on every bus wanting to help (themselves) are cut out of the loop when food donations to a charity are concerned by the Bill Emerson Good Samaritan food donation act (P.L. 104-210):
The Bill Emerson Good Samaritan Food Donation Act
On October 1, 1996, President Clinton signed the Bill Emerson Good Samaritan Food Donation Act to encourage the donation of food and grocery products to non-profit organizations for distribution to needy individuals. This law makes it easier to donate. Here's how:
It protects donors from liability when donating to a non-profit organization.     
It protects donors from civil and criminal liability should the product donated in good faith later cause harm to the needy recipient.     
It standardizes donor liability exposure. Donors and their legal counsel no longer have to investigate liability laws in 50 states.     
It sets a liability floor of "gross negligence" or intentional misconduct for persons who donate grocery products. (See Act text for further definitions.)
Congress recognized that the provision of food close to recommended date of sale is, in and of itself, not grounds for finding gross negligence. For example, cereal can be donated if it is marked close to code date for retail sale.
The bill was named for Rep. Bill Emerson (R-Missouri) who fought for the proposal but died of cancer before it was passed. The text of this Act follows:
http://www.licares.org/General_Information/Good_Samaritan_Act.htm
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On Wed, 10 Sep 2008 23:25:04 -0400, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Write a letter to the manager telling him you put this on the NG and send a copy of the letter to HD headquarters. Let the manager know a copy is going to HG.
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Two issues with donating:
1. It brings out the moochers and beggars. Every half-assed "charity" organization will be beating down the doors of their local BOB store for donations if word gets out. Really, it's a nightmare.
2. Liability. Some stupid kid gets a zipper cut from one of those bags and mom sues BOB for a million dollars in medical bills and mental anguish. Even if they win, it doesn't come without cost.
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