HELP with Goo-Gone spill!!

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We have a brand new home. I was cleaning some stickers off the glass fireplace covers and spilled about half a cup full of goo-gone onto the fireplace hearth. It's a very light, cream-colored limestone. I wiped it up as much as I could, but it left a wet-looking spot on the stone about a foot wide. Is there some way I can get it out? Will it dissipitate through the stone over time?
I'm thinking of heating it with a small propane torch, perhaps.... a blow dryer had no effect.
Please help - this is our brand new home, we moved in 1 week ago, and this looks horrible, right in the living room. Please reply to the group.
Thanks, Ron M.
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On Thu, 27 Aug 2009 14:52:47 -0700 (PDT), against all advice,

Put goo-gone on the whole stone so it will look even.
On a more serious note, I'd contact the manufacturer and see if they have a suggestion.

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wrote:

(Citrus and Petroleum Solvent-Based Stain Remover)
I looked at the MSDS Sheet. It suggest: STEPS TO BE TAKEN IN CASE OF SPILLAGE OR LEAKAGE: Ventilate area. Spilled material can be picked up with sorbant material. Use caution where surfaces may become slippery from spilled material.
Cat litter?
http://www.ifa.hawaii.edu/instr-shop/MSDS/Goo%20Gone.pdf
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Oren wrote:

a dye or pigment to set the stain. I might try some household shower spray with bleach and if that does not work the suggestion to stain the whole surface might not be a bad idea. One of my fireplace hearths is white brick and I've found it impossible to clean as stuff soaks in.
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Why not burn some wood which should discolor the whole thing evenly??
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On Thu, 27 Aug 2009 18:21:21 -0400, Frank

I've seen other MSDS sheets state "proprietary mixture" and nothing more. I don't think that takes away the suggestion to use an absorbent material to dry it out.
OP could DAGS cleaning limestone.
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Oren wrote:

Yes, you are correct. I write a lot of MSDS's and while liking to fully disclose all chemicals, client will often want to hold composition confidential. Important thing is to disclose toxicity and flammability. I often have to go back to the manufacturer who supplies an MSDS like this to get further regulatory information. For example, a client wants to market his US material in Europe. I'm working on one now with a European associate and it's been 4 months gathering suppliers' information. The Goo Gone MSDS satisfies OSHA and EPA regulations but information is minimal.
Problem here is that while adequate clean up information is given, product has soaked into a porous surface most likely causing stain by small amount of coloring in product.
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On Thu, 27 Aug 2009 20:00:52 -0400, Frank

My granite counter has one stain. For some reason the previous owner would sit dish detergent bottles next to the sink. Never cleaned or rinsed the bottles off or sat them on the sink edge. Try as we may, the stain is still visible. We have lightened it a bit, but never get it out.
The rest of the house was a perfect deal!
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to say:

uhhh, you wanna burn down your house??? I never use the goo-gone. I only use regular cooking oil. It does a nice job. Don't leave opened containers. Open only when you need more product, then close again.

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Lighter Fluid (Ronsonol-type, not charcoal grill type) and WD-40 are both great for removing adhesives from just about any surface.
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On Thu, 27 Aug 2009 18:17:35 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

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WD 1 - 39 were the "failed" attempts by the lab at the Rocket Chemical Company to create the "perfect" water displacement (WD) formula.
I kid you not...
http://www.wd40.com/about-us/history /
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On Thu, 27 Aug 2009 18:38:12 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

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http://www.wd40.com/about-us/history /
I just read the history of WD-40 and I noticed that they say "In 2009, WD-40 Company introduced WD-40 Trigger Pro a non-aerosol product with the same WD-40 formula"
However, I've been buying this:
http://www.wd40.com/products/one-gallon /
and putting it in these for years:
http://media.mydoitbest.com/imagerequest.aspx?sku=575402&size=2&warehouse=C&newsize=600
That's means they've had a "a non-aerosol product with the same WD-40 formula" available long before 2009, you just had to fill your own WD-40 spray bottles.
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Im pretty sure they had them earlier. I remember my dad buying pump sprayers of WD40 from the traveling parts supplier when we had a service station.
Jimmie
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Obviously, they must be talking about the WD-40 Trigger Pro *can* but the way they worded it sure make it sound like they just introduced "a non-aerosol product with the same WD-40 formula" in 2009.
Even the 55 gallon drums have been around for many years.
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to say:

Doesn't God make limestone?
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bstevens wrote:

I don't know what the constituents of goo-gone are but do know that putting a propane torch close to limestone so that it becomes hot does not sound like a good idea.
Does goo-gone have organic solvents; how volatile are these; will they evaporate over time?
Sorry not to be more helpful.
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Spill more. Go buy more and do the whole area, you wont clean it from the stone, it may dry lighter it may not who cares it will all be even and you wont be worrying you ruined anything anymore.
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Its possible that what you seeing is not the goo gone but the absence of a finish that the goo gone removed.
Don't torch it!! stone masons use torches to texture stone and may make it worse.

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