Guide to use of Lally (Lolly) columns.

I'm looking at framing the interior of an addition with a full basement and it appears that lally columns will be neede to support the floor above the basement.
So I'm, looking for information regarding spacing footing etc, similar to the tables available for joist and rafter sizing.
A quick Google search turned up a lot of useful information abouit replacing them, but nothing regarding installing them 'from scratch'.
I know enough engineering to understand something that is intended for a contractor or architect.
--

FF


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On 5 May 2006 17:39:33 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@spamcop.net wrote:

from: http://www.destefanoassociates.com/tech/lally_columns.pdf
Unbraced Length: 6' 7' 8' 9' 10' 11' 3.5" column 8.8 8.5 8.2 7.8 7.3 n/a 4" column 11.4 11.1 10.7 10.3 9.9 9.4
(In kips {being 1000 US statute pounds})
The search terms you wanted were "concentric load" and "lally column".
--Goedjn
I'll bet, however, that if you put up a series of beams supported only at the ends, (like a timber frame), you'll find that you can clear the entire span with no posts in the middle. If you use joist hangers instead of setting your floor-joists ON the beam, you can use beams that are around 10" deeper than you thought you could.
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Goedjn wrote:

Thanks.
I had already planned on using joist hangers. What I'm working on now is trying to reduce the depth of the beams and the number of supporting columns to maximize the utility of the basement area.
Were it not for building codes (and inspectors) I'd consider running a series of box-beams accross in lieu of joists. That'd be expensive and labor intensive, but worth it in the long run.
Wood I-beams or Laminated beams might help, but all of the wood I-beams I have seen locally use OSB for the web. No doubt they are adequate when new but I worry that in the future, something like a leaking pipe might destroy it. 'Real' wood beams retain their integrity if they are dried out again right away after getting wet. My experience with OSB is that it is pretty much ruined if it gets a good soaking.
OTOH, I could waterproof them, using something like West system epoxy.
--

FF


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On 8-May-2006, snipped-for-privacy@spamcop.net wrote:

There's nothing in the building codes that forbids this - you just have to prove that it's at least as good as standard construction.
Are you using several steel beams or one long beam spanning all columns?
Mike
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