Grinding/cutting Concrete


Here's the problem: I had a polebarn built last year. It has 2 overhead doors that are 14' high and 12' wide. The concrete slopes toward the doors as it should. But, the concrete extends about 16 inches past the doors. In this 16", the concrete sloops toward the doors (not to the outside drive) allowing water to seep thru the overhead door seal and not away from the door.
Questions: Can it be ground down to look ok? Should it be cut out and replaced? What is the best fix?
It is only about 1/4 inch too high.
Thanks,
Hank
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I've seen them grind down sections of concrete sidewalk that roots pushed up. Wasn't watching so I don't know how long it took. But they did take an inch or more off in some cases. I'd be checking out rental rates for the equipment to help with that decision. Is the exterior area part of the slab in the barn? Cause if it is then you'll have to have it cut off to replace. That would make grinding more appealing.
Any chance that a gutter could lessen the water coming down in front of the door? If you could minimize the problem maybe you could live with it?
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The doors are 14 feet high, I doubt any gutter would make a difference. I called the guy who put poured the concrete, he is coming to take a look and see what can be done.
Hank
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Assuming the concrete is 3 to 4 inches thick, you should be able to grind off 1/2 inch without making the concrete too weak.
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wrote:

The concrete is 6" thick. I hope you're right. I like the grinding down part much more than the cut-out way.
Hank
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Hustlin' Hank wrote:

do you care what it looks like? if not, the tool to do this would only cost you a few hundred dollars, or could be rented for less, and you could diy.
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wrote:

I agree. I'd rent the tool. It's mostly a matter of getting the equipment in the right place and patience. But if you're going to hire someone that $650 doesn't sound bad.
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On Wed, 9 Jun 2010 05:11:30 -0700 (PDT), "Hustlin' Hank"

Can you just cut some sloped kerfs with a diamond saw blade that will allow the water to drain away without grinding down the whole area?
If that doesn't work, then grinding isn't that big a job. It makes a mess, but since it's outside, that won't be a big deal. Check yellow pages or online for concrete cutting and grinding.
Paul F.
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wrote:

I did call 3 concrete sawing companies. One never returned my call, one said I would have to have a section cut out and replaced at $1K per door, the other said they could grind it down about 1/4-1/2" for $650 for both doors.
I am waiting on the original installer to see what he says. I am hoping he can grind it down at no charge and still look ok. He said he will stop by in the next few days. We'll see if that happens. I'll try to keep you all posted.
Hank
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The installer showed up today. He agreed that it needed ground down. He cut a groove inside the door about 1/4" deep to use as a border/ guide. He then took a grinder and ground down the area where the door sits all the way to the outside edge, so that the door sits in a 1/4' pocket. Now the water should drain to the outside rather than inside. He was here for about 5 hours, but it looks pretty good, almost like marble. He said he will come back and do the other door if there is a problem.
I am amazed he even showed up. Then I was almost in shock when he said he would do it right then. Shows me there are some honest and hard working contractors in this world.
Hank
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Hank there are darned few of them out there. Sounds like you got a good one.
Word of mouth advertising for the contractor is the nicest thing you can do for him/her. Don't miss a chance to refer this person to others.
Colbyt
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I agree. I will recommend him to others for sure.
Hank
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