gold color solder (jewelry repair)?


While shortening a gold-color chain bracelet for a friend I found the two O-shape end links can be bent opened fairly easily. I.e. if stretched, the link could turn to C shape and fall out.
Is there gold-color solder that can be used to solder the ends of the link together so it can't open?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
james wrote:

AFAIK, you'll need something to braze with rather than solder any jewelry metal whether its really gold or not. I've no expertise other than I'm virtually positive it isn't solder you're looking for here...
I'd guess a search for jewelry repairs and the arts/crafts groups will be better places than ahr.
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

ask on rec.crafts.metalworking. There's a rec.crafts.jewelry, which is moderated, but not highly active.
Myself, I've never seen colored solder. Now, *silver* soldering, which is more akin to brazing, may have tints. Brazes themselves are of course brass/bronze. But, if your chain is gold *colored*, brazing might do more cosmetic damage.
In a worse-case scenario, you could cut a link, and add one that IS braze-able, in the right color.
--
EA
>



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You can buy gold solder in sheet form, wire form and, from some dealers, in 1 mm chips (the advantage of the chips is that it's easier to control the precise amount of solder being applied). Gold solder comes in easy, medium and hard, which denotes its melting temperature (easy melts at a lower temperature), but isn't as hard as 14K gold.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

show. Any thing else would be seen. WW
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
WW wrote:

No way would a tiny bit of epoxy add much strength there.
The OP should get some gold solder, borax flux, and one of those small butane torches and do the job right, or let a jeweler do it for him.
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?ItemnumberB099
If he really wants to go retro, he could replace the butane torch with an alcohol lamp and a mouth blowpipe. That's what I learned to solder jewelry with about 60 years ago.
Jeff
--
Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Part of the reason for that is if someone tried to snatch your chain you're not tethered to it. I had that happen while in Brazil when a thug with 4 of his friends snuck up behind me and tried to snatch my chain. Luckily the clasp and "soft" rings were in the back of my neck so the chain broke and fell down my chest where I could catch it. for the few seconds that it took to open up were precarious though.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Part of the reason for that is if someone tried to snatch your chain you're not tethered to it. I had that happen while in Brazil when a thug with 4 of his friends snuck up behind me and tried to snatch my chain. Luckily the clasp and "soft" rings were in the back of my neck so the chain broke and fell down my chest where I could catch it. for the few seconds that it took to open up were precarious though.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Part of the reason for that is if someone tried to snatch your chain you're not tethered to it. I had that happen while in Brazil when a thug with 4 of his friends snuck up behind me and tried to snatch my chain. Luckily the clasp and "soft" rings were in the back of my neck so the chain broke and fell down my chest where I could catch it. for the few seconds that it took to open up were precarious though.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.