GFI receptacle not functioning?


GFI receptacle I thought that if one receptacle on a breaker was GFI that covered all the other receptacles on that run/breaker? On two occasions, I experienced the breaker tripping when moisture caused a short in the run at another location. thanks tom
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snipped-for-privacy@dva.state.wi.us wrote:

It all depends on how the wiring was done. If the downstream receptacles are wired to the "LOAD" terminal on the GFCI then they are protected, otherwise they are not.
--
John McGaw
[Knoxville, TN, USA]
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On Apr 16, 9:29 am, snipped-for-privacy@dva.state.wi.us wrote:

It does provided:
1) The GFCI works. 2) The GFCI is wired properly. Downstream receptacles should be connected to the "Load" Terminals. 3) The GFCI is the first receptacle in the run.
I'd start my checks at number one and work down.
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Agree completely. The only time our garage GFI outlet has 'tripped' has been when an outside outlet correctly wired as a downstream to the GFI has got wet (Outside wall buried in melting snow!). Suggest the OP check that the GFI is wired correctly as recommended above. BTW I had one older style GFI that was not arranged for 'wiring through' to downstream outlets. I therefore replaced the first one on that run with a suitable GFI and in order not to waste it relegated the older style GFI to a metal box for single, use on the end of an extension cord that needed repair. Provides a portable GFI outlet no matter where I plug the extension cord in.
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In addition to what Eric said: GFCI outlets are not circuit breakers. They trip on ground faults, not overloads

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On 16 Apr 2007 09:29:21 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@dva.state.wi.us wrote:

So what's your point? Did you want the GFI NOT to trip then?
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snipped-for-privacy@dva.state.wi.us wrote:

Let me see if I correctly understand what you wrote.
I take it as your saying that you have a circuit fed by a panel breaker which has a GFI receptical on it and the "load" side of that receptical feeds other outlets.
Then you say "the breaker tripping". I take that to be the panel breaker.
That could happen if the moisture created short occured between the hot and neutral leads downstream of the GFI, without any leakage to grount, but I'm having a hard time believing that could occur.
So which was it, did the panel breaker trip or the GFI?
Jeff
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On Apr 16, 12:29 pm, snipped-for-privacy@dva.state.wi.us wrote:

stop and read: http://www.codecheck.com/gfci_principal.htm
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Thanks. The answer is that the GFI is not down stream of the shorted wire.
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