GFI outlet


I am OK with basic wiring(installing new outlets , switches, running a line for a new outlet or light)
I am just not 100% sure about GFI outlets.
If I want to replace an existing outlet with a GFI outlet is it as easy as buying a GFI outlet and switching them out?
If not what has to be done? Should I get a licensed electrician to do these GFI outlets?
Thanks
Charlie
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Postal68 wrote:

Assuming the existing outlets are wired correctly, it's just a matter of swapping the GFI outlet for a conventional one.
If there is more than one outlet "chained" on the circuit, you're best off putting the GFI one in the location closest to the panel, where it will provided GFI protection at the ones down the line.
Jeff
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Jeff Wisnia wrote:

Jeff I have run several service calls that were caused by tripped GFCI receptacles. I recommend that GFCIs not be used to protect outlets that are not in the same room as the GFCI that is protecting them unless it is located at the panel. -- Tom Horne
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Thanks Jeff, I was aware of this, when I learned of it, I found it quite interesting.
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On Sat, 14 Apr 2007 21:36:17 -0400, Jeff Wisnia

Also, a GFCI cannot be wired so each receptacle is wired differently (such as one half switched).
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GFCI's are fairly simple to install assuming you know how to wire standard receptacles. The watchout is that the supply wiring needs to be installed on the "Line" terminals and the wiring to the downstream outlets need to landed on the "Load" terminals. If they are crossed, and a ground fault occurs in a device plugged into the GFCI, the power will not be interrupted. Recently GFCI's have been required to deny power to an outlet if it is miswired but I am sure there are some older ones still floating around for sale. The really important part is testing GFCI's after installation, most people don't.
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It's so easy, even I can do it. GFCI protection is only required at certain locations, like bathroom, garages, outside, and a few others. Some things you wouldn't want GFCI protected like outlets for freezers, or refrigerators. Assuming you only want GFCI protection at the location of this outlet replacement, remove the existing outlet, note brass screws on one side of the outlet and silver screws on the other. The brass screws should have the hot wires on them and the silver should have the white. If there are only two wires plus ground on the receptacle, install the white on the silver" line" terminal, and the black on the brass "line" terminal and ground on the green ground terminal. If there is more than one wire on either side of the existing receptacle, splice them together with a pigtail wires to the GFCI outlet

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On Sat, 14 Apr 2007 22:49:31 -0400, "RBM" <rbm2(remove

What do they say about the outlet for a washing machine in the basement.

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In unfinished parts of basements or garages, readily accessible outlets are required to be GFCI protected. Outlets on ceilings or outlets installed behind and dedicated for specific, not easily moved appliances, like washers, dryers, refrigerators, etc. do not need GFCI protection

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On Sun, 15 Apr 2007 08:39:38 -0400, "RBM" <rbm2(remove

Thanks. I don't think I meet that standard. I will check as soon as I can.
What if half the basement is finished, meaning drywall, and the other half isn't? Do I have to GFCI the outlets on the drywalled part?

It may be dedicated to my washer, but it's not behind, and it didnt stop me from plugging a remote dialer into the other half. Later I wanted to unplug the washer to plug in a wet-dry vac, to vacuum up the water on the floor, that I was standing in. I only touched the cord an inch behind the plug, to unplug the washer, but I think the maybe wet dust conducted enough current to give me a small buzz and a scare.
W

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