GFCI wiring question

My garage had a GFCI outlet with loose prongs, so I took it out to replace it with a standard outlet (all I had). The outlet was wired using both LINE/LOAD. So I used the Line and capped off the Load.
The next morning we discover that BOTHour bathroom outlets don't work, and possibly others in the house. The bathroom outlets have standard plugs in them.
Not knowing much about GFCI outlets at the time, I looked at instructions online. Now I know that I can power other outlets via LOAD, which apparently is what was going on with my 2 bathroom outlets.
My question is this: Is it OK to wire multiple (2 or more) regular outlets off the load wires on a single GFCI outlet? Or do I still need a GFCI outlet at every location?
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Sounds like you disconnected them.

Mighta been a good idea to look at instructions first... :-)

installed, evidently.) You do not need GFCI outlets at every location. That's why there's a LOAD side on the GFCI: to enable it to protect multiple outlets "downstream".
-- Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Doug,
Thanks for the info. One last question. Is there a limit to the number of outlets I should chain off 1 GFCI outlet, aside from the amperage on my breaker that the GFCI runs from? (FYI, I have a 15A breaker dedicated for GFCI useage)
Evan
wrote:

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matter, I'd think you might want to limit it to around three or four, so you don't lose too many receptacles at once if the GFCI trips.
Sorry I can't be of more help.
-- Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
How come we choose from just two people to run for president and 50 for Miss America?
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As far as I know there are no special limits on the number GFCI outlets. However there is a general limit on the total number of outlets per circuit.
The CEC states that no more than 12 outlets (including lights, and receptacles) be on any one circuit. I think the NEC is the same in this regard. In practice most electricians like to stay well below this (8-10). There are special rules regarding motor loads (ie: dishwasher, washing machine, refrigerator etc) and outdoor outlets but from your post it would appear that none of these apply here.
--



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Hi Evan!
EM> My garage had a GFCI outlet with loose prongs, so I took it out to replace EM> it with a standard outlet (all I had). The outlet was wired using both EM> LINE/LOAD. So I used the Line and capped off the Load. Oops!
EM> The next morning we discover that BOTHour bathroom outlets don't work, and EM> possibly others in the house. The bathroom outlets have standard plugs in EM> them. Hair styler and electric razor didn't work?!
EM> Not knowing much about GFCI outlets at the time, I looked at instructions EM> online. Now I know that I can power other outlets via LOAD, which EM> apparently is what was going on with my 2 bathroom outlets. Very good. :)
EM> My question is this: Is it OK to wire multiple (2 or more) regular outlets EM> off the load wires on a single GFCI outlet? Or do I still need a GFCI EM> outlet at every location? One GFCI will protect numerous 'downstream' outlets. It is common practice to have several GFCI-protected outlets. Would be nice if the GFCI was located in the bathroom rather than the garage so when it trips one doesn't have to go out in jammies to reset it.
..You could move the (new) GFCI to the first outlet in the bathroom. The 'first' outlet is the one receiving the power and continues it on -- will probably have two sets of wires to it.
You could retain a GFCI in the garage (not a bad idea) though I would probably wire the bathroom circuit directly to the power source so when the garage GFCI trips it doesn't take out the bathroom outlets also.
- barry.martinATthesafebbs.zeppole.com
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In article

I found that GFCI trip pretty easily when they are wired in series with the circuit. Better to pigtail them in parallel with the circuit using only the line circuit and protect each plug individually.
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C > > You could retain a GFCI in the garage (not a bad idea) though I would C > > probably wire the bathroom circuit directly to the power source so C > > when the garage GFCI trips it doesn't take out the bathroom outlets C > > also. C > I found that GFCI trip pretty easily when they are wired in series with C > the circuit. Better to pigtail them in parallel with the circuit using C > only the line circuit and protect each plug individually.
Thanks for the feedback, CK. Haven't had to install multiple GFCI's on the same circuit.
- barry.martinATthesafebbs.zeppole.com
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