GFCI Fuese

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On Sun, 04 Sep 2016 00:18:20 +0100, "James Wilkinson"
The ironic thing is you could build a brand new house today and use a fuse panel as long as you had the "type S" rejection devices in the sockets that prevent putting in the wrong fuse. The problem becomes the 240v circuits where there is no rejection device although the 30a class fuse holder will not take a 40 or 50. The problem would be the range, wired with 8ga and the next size fuse holder that will take a 60. Then you get down to the AFCI and GFCI requirements although the code does allow the "device type". There is also no money to be saved by doing it. If you could find a 200a fuse panel, it would cost more than a breaker panel by the time you also bought all the required AFCIs and GFCIs.
My circa 1971 house in Md did have a 200a fuse panel and aluminum wire. It hasn't burned down yet.
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Funny, my mother had a 10A kettle working on a 5A fuse for about 3 months before it blew.
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FrozenNorth wrote :

The correct fuse selection should avoid this nuisance.
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After serious thinking James Wilkinson wrote :

The same still applies. The proper fuse should be selected for whatever application.
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Yes, sorry, I was more replying to the previous poster.
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On Saturday, September 3, 2016 at 1:14:05 PM UTC-5, Helen Keech wrote:

ne in

se-902203-.htm
The GFCI looks for equal currents in the hot and neutral conductors, using a transformer with both windings connected. A third winding will have an o utput if the (other) two currents are not equal. This is why a GFCI will s ometimes trip on "noise", because while equal the two currents are at 60 Hz , there is noise" at some higher frequency that is not equal on both conduc tors.
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