GFCI Fuese

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Are there any 20 amp GFCI protected FUSES available. I need to replace one in a junction fuse box.
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Helen Keech wrote:

Just a guess.. If not, there is probably one you could put inline.
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On 2016-09-03 2:14 PM, Helen Keech wrote:

I doubt it very much, probably better off replacing your panel for breakers if that is an issue or requirement.
--
Froz....

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On Sat, 03 Sep 2016 18:14:01 +0000, Helen Keech

Put a GFCI outlet in the first box on the string, feed the down stream from the "load" side. If this confuses you, call an electrician.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Are you suggesting he merely "plug-in" that string? Is that likely to satisfy code requirements?
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On 2016-09-03 6:12 PM, Bill wrote:

No he isn't, you should call an electrician.
--
Froz....

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FrozenNorth wrote:

Then the way I understand it, the "downstream" part won't be GFCI-protected.
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On Saturday, September 3, 2016 at 9:11:31 PM UTC-4, Bill wrote:

A GFCI receptacle (outlet) will protect whatever is plugged into it and whateven is connected to it's load side. As Gfre suggested, that's an easy way to protect subsequent outlets that are downstream of it. It's very common, including in new construction. One GFCI receptacle in a bathroom providing protection for multiple outlets is an example.
To answer your original question, I've never heard of a GFCI fuse replacement that just goes in place of an existing fuse. One reason it can't is a GFCI device needs to be in both the hot and neutral conductors so it can compare the currents, that's how it works. A fuse is only in the hot side on a 120V circuit.
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trader_4 wrote:

In retrospect, that makes sense. Thanks! I had no idea how GFCI receptacles worked, though I have installed a few.
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That is precisely why he said you should call an electrician.
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wrote:

If properly installed, all "downstream" components are protected. Upstream are not. Properly installed means connected to the panel with the "line" screws, and the downstream connected to the "load" screws.
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On Saturday, September 3, 2016 at 10:23:47 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Well, we should make sure we are clear in our wording for the non-initiated.
A GFCI with downstream fixtures (receptacles, etc.) connected to line screws would still be considered "properly installed" as long as downstream protection is not desired. There is nothing "mandatory" about using the load side for downstream fixtures.
In addition, it doesn't have to be connected to the *panel*, at least not directly.
*Source wires connected to the line screws" would cover all cases better than "connected to the panel". That's a bit of a nit, but it covers it all just a little more clearly.
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DerbyDad03 wrote:

Another post suggested that GFCI protection would be given to downstream receptacles. It's just a matter of curiosity to me. It still is... Whatever anyone does, use an outlet tester! ; )
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On Sunday, September 4, 2016 at 12:55:45 AM UTC-4, Bill wrote:

The downstream receptacles are GFCI protected if the the GFCI is installed so that they are connected to the load side of the GFCI. The nit that Derby is pointing out is that Clare said "properly installed". He's right, you can properly install a GFCI so that only the GFCI receptacle itself is protected, by wiring the downstream receptacles to the power side of the wiring, instead of the load side. There is nothing that says you can't do it that way and you might have a reason for wanting it that way.
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trader_4 wrote:

I see. I didn't understand the significance of "properly installed"--but I get it now (the wording is probably related to "proper subset" in mathematics). Thanks!
Bill
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On Sat, 3 Sep 2016 20:52:01 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

NitPicker. In order to provide downstream protection, they need to be "properly installed" - which means installed as I described.

Agaiun, nitpicker. It IS connected to the panel - one way or another. The "downstream" side is the side NOT connected to the panel in any way if the GFCI device is removed.
Upstream = panel side = LIVE Downstrream = load = DEAD

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On Sunday, September 4, 2016 at 2:07:42 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

So, just to be clear, are you saying that a GFCI with the downstream receptacles connected to the line side is *not* properly installed?

I already said that that was a nit, in fact it's still there at the bottom of this post.
In any case, thank you for affirmation.

Unless to downstream receptacles were wired nutted to the source wires and then pigtailed to the line side of the GFCI. I think that that would be a "proper installation" but I'd not be upset if I found out that it was not.

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On Mon, 5 Sep 2016 04:16:48 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

It is not "properly ninstalled" to provide downstream protection if the downstream is not connected to the load side.
The OP was confused about whether a CGCI outlet protected the outletsm downstream, and I said it did if it was properly installed - OBVIOUSLY meaning properly installed to do the required job of protecting the downstream circuits.

To those of us who understand these things, yes. To those who don't have a clue, perhaps not.
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On Monday, September 5, 2016 at 6:06:27 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

The difference between you and I in regards to both of these issues is that I see your explanations being more fitting for someone in the know, while you (I think) think that they are geared more for the novice.
Allow me to explain just you know where I'm coming from.
When I hear "properly installed GFCI" I immediately think "properly installed for what purpose"? Properly installed to provide downstream protection or properly installed to protect only itself even though there are downstream fixtures? When discussing this with someone who has no idea how a GFCI works and/or how it can be used, I feel that we would be doing them a disservice if we give the impression that using a GFCI to provide downstream protection is the only "proper" way to install one. That is why I nitpicked your use of the words "properly installed." It wasn't a slam on you, it was a teaching moment for the novices.
The same (IMO) holds for the use of the words "connected to the panel". Yes, those of us familiar with electrical wiring and specifically GFCI's know that it all eventually ends up back at the panel, but once again I feel that we need to be perfectly clear for those that have less experience. If they don't know how a GFCI works, then they may take the words "connected to the panel with the line screws" literally. In other words, if they don't know how a GFCI works, they may think that it needs to be first device in a branch circuit since the words used were "connected to the panel".
Again, all I was doing was clarifying both issues, even it was picking a nit. What may be a nit to us could save a novice both confusion and extra work.
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On Mon, 5 Sep 2016 16:46:32 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

If installing a GFCI outlet instead of a GFI breaker it will be for 1 of 3 reasons. Number 1 - lower cost to provide complete circuit protection - On my QO panel installation a GFCI outlet is about half the cost of a breaker. I used GFCI breakers even though the cost was higher on the circuits that were not covered by item #3 to follow.
#2 - installing GFCI protection on a fused panel - no other reasonable way to do it. Again - protecting the entire circuit. (sometimes done at the panel - running the wires from the panel to a "deadhead" gfci device - but using a normal GFCI outlet in place of the "deadhead" is cheaper and they are more readily available)
#3 = protecting one or more outlet on a circuit where you do not want the rest of the circuit protected. An example is one circuit feeds powder-room receptacele, refrigerator, and outdoor weatherproof - in that order. The powder-room and weatherproof require GFCI protection - while it is preferred NOT to have a GFCI on the fridge.. This is the only situation where NOT using the feedthrough would be "properly installed"

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