GFCI Breaker or Outlet?

I am runnign a new circuit to a screened porch for 3 outlets. I want to have these on a GFI circuit. The way I see it there are 2 options. One is to install a GFI Circuit breaker for the curcuit. The other is to make the forst plug a GFI outlet and run the circuit through it to protect the rest of the circuit. Is there a difference between the two? Is one prefered over the other? The rest of the house (built 2001) uses the latter approach for its GFI circuits.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

both work, having the GFCI near the point of use is a lot more convenient when they trip.
I have done what you plan, plus a GFCI breaker on a real long branch can trip because of inductive coupling.
yours is the best solution
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

both work, having the GFCI near the point of use is a lot more convenient when they trip.
I have done what you plan, plus a GFCI breaker on a real long branch can trip because of inductive coupling.
yours is the best solution
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

The primary difference is in the cost. For whatever stupid reason a GFCI breaker costs a *lot* more than a standard breaker and separate GFCI outlet.
Since a standard GFCI outlet provides protection for everything downstream of it, there is little difference protection wise. I even saw one odd case where someone installed a bank of GFCI outlets directly beside their service panel to provide GFCI protection for the circuits. Looks pretty odd and an inspector is likely to question it though probably pass it. I'd guess it saves on the order of $20+ per protected circuit depending on the brand of breakers.
Pete C.
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wrote:

There are space limitations for breakers. That might have something to do with it. Or, like most things, things cost more when a smaller quantity is made.

--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

It seems that GFCI outlets sell for much less than GFCI breakers. Use the outlets unless the situation makes the breakers easier enough to justify the cost.
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On 29 Aug 2006 11:35:34 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

For me, imho, I measure things sometimes on cost, ease of installation, and operation.
1. A GFCI receptacle is typically cheaper than GFCI breaker. 2. I find a GFCI receptacle easier/SAFER to install than a GFCI breaker. I keep my panel energized. 3. If I trip a GFCI circuit, I want the reset in the immediate area. So I don't have to walk far. The GFCI receptacle sounds like a winner here too.
So, without seeing your setup, it seems in my option a receptacle would make me happy.
later,
tom @ www.BlankHelp.com
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Tom The Great wrote:

Thanks for all the info. I assumed that the receptacle would work fine, but just I was trying to figure out if there was an actual justification to the breaker being more expensive. Looks like in dollars and effort the receptacle is the better buy.
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