Getting Rid of Mice in Basement

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Joseph Meehan wrote:

Then there's Towser.
During her 23-year lifespan, Towser caught 23,898 mice at the Glenturrent Distillery in Scotland (plus a few rats and an occassional rabbit).
Towser is immortalized both by mention in the Guinesss Book of Records and by a bronze statue of her at the distillery.
Here's a test: If the cat will chase a laser pointer dot, I'd bet she'd be a good mouser.
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wrote:

What did mice do before there were lasers?
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My experience after one year of owning a new double wide which we use as a cabin is that the mice will run off with scads of bait and hide it in the most improbable places. I learned from a pro, right here on this NG that traps are a more efficient solution. Set the traps with the bait towards the wall (being rectangular this means that the narrow edge with the bait pad goes against the wall). This is because the mice slink along the wall using their whiskers as feelers and often blunder into the trap. The bait that I have used successfully is peanutbutter - it's aromatic. I feel that the traps are more humane than the sticky paper because death is quick and not prolonged with great struggling. Our mouse problem is less constant but since the little buggers are great breeders there will be a nearly endless supply of them. An outside cat is usually a better mouser because they aren't spoiled and they remain curious and aware. When I've had outside cats in the country I've not had much problem with mice getting into the house.
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C & E wrote:

HaHaHa! I recently removed a 275 Gal oil tank in the basement. We Sawzalled the legs off close to the floor. These were hollow pipes, open at the top.
When removed, there were 4 tidy piles of bait on the floor. The mice had been dutifully carting the stuff all the way down from the attached garage, thru the crawl space.
Jim
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How about when your car starts running poorly and the critters have filled up the air box with corn or chewed up the main wiring harness on your car.

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Does this mean that they didn't die from it? How long does it take for this stuff to kill a mouse, and do they carry it back to their nest before or after they eat it?

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mm wrote:

Most cause death 4-5 days after consumption. The D-con type pellets are easily carried away, with the bait blocks and meal baits they tend to eat it where they find it.
Lar
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wrote:

After going thru several large boxes of the stuff I figured that they were either immune, had a colony of hundreds or decided that this was like canned peaches which they would save for times when the natural food sources were covered with snow. After finding the pellets in our bed and on a high shelf at our cabin I wnt to the traps. Three mice later I didn't have another infestation for a couple of months, caught two more a couple weeks ago so we'll see how long that lasts. Traps... **get traps**!!!
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wrote:

So this means it's possible they carry the portable bait to their nest, but still eat it and die later.

Oooo :(

I have this too. and this is my big question, the part I don't get. They tell me mice reproduce quickly, so how come if I kill two or three, or even if I just straigten up the house, they disappear for months at a time? Did I scare them away. Are they hiding and eating food they stockpiled, or getting hungry. I thought they had to eat every day or two.
For a couple weeks I would hear what were probably footstep in the ceiling of my kitchen, but that stopped months ago. Did they not have any babies?
Another time I seemed to have none for 18 months, so was I reinfested or was I just not paying attention?
How come it SEEMS so easy to get rid of them.

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Perhaps, because when you find evidence of mice and set traps or whatever, you're also careful to eliminate accessible food sources?
I know that when I've had ants in the house, I'm really careful about food storage, crumbs on the floor etc. for several months after that.
--
|~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~|
| Malcolm Hoar "The more I practice, the luckier I get". |
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A reminder-RODENTS EAT FECES.
On Feb 17, 2:16 pm, snipped-for-privacy@malch.com (Malcolm Hoar) wrote:

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mm wrote:

Under perfect conditions, a female may breed 45-60 days from being born. Gestation is around 20 days, a litter of a healthy mouse during peak breeding age is 10-12 pups. She is ready to breed again 48 hours of having her litter. So if half the litter is female that will be ready to breed in 5-6 weeks. By the time first litter came of age to start breeding themselves mama mouse could of already had another litter and a third on the way.
Part of the perfect condition would be a moussy(moussie?) world with no predators. Most people are surprised to the amount of snakes that are in any given area along with pet cats, ferrel cats, rats, owls, etc. all feeding on the lower rungs of the food chain. Mice are also territorial. Amount of available food may determine what populations you will see. If there is not food to share with the kiddos they will be chased off to find their own territory. The live catch & then go release elsewhere is more of a feel good for the human doing the trapping. Chances are the released mouse has gone through a couple of hard days of fighting for their lives before dieing.
Lar

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A friends basement STANK he had used poision, he now uses traps.
I have used a live trap, and released them outdoors. nearly all survived the elderly grey hair ones didnt do so well.
I had stupidly had a 50 pound sack of sunflower seeds in basement for bird feeding. 10 years later I was still finding seed shells in wall cavities.
When remodeling kitchen I put cement around all flooir openings like gas line, the mice use those tiny holes as runways
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How long? Too damn long. That's why you should use spring traps: they kill in an instant.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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On Sat, 17 Feb 2007 13:55:41 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Not an instant I don't think. At least not all the time. Way back in Brooklyn 24+ years ago, We had mice for a year out of the 12 I was there, and one night I was still awake when the snap trap snapped. I heard him whining for about 6 seconds before he shut up. 6 seconds isn't that long though. My roommate said traps were cruel and we should use a cat, but months later it occurred to me that cats really torment mice before they kill them. If a mousee can feel fear at all, he must be scared when the cat is holding him and taking him to the kittens etc.
Even the silence after 6 seconds doesn't mean he was dead yet, because in the glue traps they struggle for a while and then become still for a long time. But if I touch the glue trap, they start struggling again.
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mm wrote:

I have a handful of customers that have the "Rat-Zapper" Impressed me enough to want to sell them myself, but they are pricey to begin with so don't think they would be worth what I would have to charge to be profitable to handle.
Lar
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They ARE worth the price. I tried snap traps, poison, sticky paper, live traps and even an exterminator and still had issues with them until I got a rat zapper. It was the best device I ever tried and it solved my problem. I spent more on all of the other methods as a rat zapper cost. I would buy another one if this one ever breaks.
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On 17 Feb 2007 17:52:31 -0800, "JimmyDahGeek@DON'T_SPAM_ME_gmail.com"

They might be hard to sell to a customer, with a markup, but the one I found on the web, the Classic (there are two models, classic and ultra.) was 29 dollars, not too much for one of the rich readers of this ng. :) I just have to find out if Jimmy the Greek is a stockholder.
http://www.ratmousezapper.com /
http://www.ratzapper.com /
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wrote:

I still like the Tin Cats. No electricity. Just toss the Tin cat in a bucket of water, wait five minutes, and empty contents. With these other electrical ones, the dead rodents may stay in there and ripen. Or just cook while staying in contact with electrical contacts for hours. Making such things as hantavirus and other nasty things a consideration.
Steve
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Geek,...Greek Very close

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