Getting a Large Tool Box Out of the Back of a Toyota Tundra?

Aside from my blade difficulty just posted, I have another tricky task. My son left me his Tundra for several years with me while he's working outside the country. He left a large tool box in the back that may weight 100 or more pounds. I'd like to get it out. It's on its side and has caster wheels. The truck bed has a camper shell. I can probably slide the box onto the bed, but getting it on the ground is likely a real challenge. I don't think I can just put up some 2x6s or plywood and slide it down. Any ideas?
Maybe removing tools would help, but since the trays are vertical, that might be difficult.
--
W. eWatson

(121.015 Deg. W, 39.262 Deg. N) GMT-8 hr std. time)
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W. eWatson wrote:

Two strong teenagers
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LouB wrote:

Not bad. I think two very strong 30 year olds, one was my son, put it in there.
--
W. eWatson

(121.015 Deg. W, 39.262 Deg. N) GMT-8 hr std. time)
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W. eWatson wrote:

Borrow a 'Cherry Picker' engine hoist.
http://affordabletool.com/ebay/images/products/0700-001-engine-hoist.jpg
Lift toolbox, drive out from underneath.
--Winston
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W. eWatson wrote:

I got a 400 lb fireplace insert into and out of my van using a couple 2x6's.
Slide the box to the back, with the end not quite 1/2 way out. Tip it onto the boards which are on the bumper, and slide it down.
If the box is full, empty it and then remove it.
Or, just get a couple friends to help.
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Bob F wrote:

Good possibilities. I think I know two guys who could do it. Hadn't thought of asking them.
--
W. eWatson

(121.015 Deg. W, 39.262 Deg. N) GMT-8 hr std. time)
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Tie a strong long rope to it. Drop the tailgate. Tie the other end of the rope to a tree or stationary object. Peel out in first gear so the box is pulled off quickly and drops straight down instead of tumbling and rolling. The wheels will be crushed, but other than that, it should be okay. The trick is get the rpms up in the 5,000 range and then to pop the clutch.
HTH
Steve
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On Wed, 24 Jun 2009 21:53:56 -0700, "W. eWatson"

Well, I had a 300-pound box to unload off my Tundra. My driveway is sloped so I positioned the back end toward uphill, making the heavy box just a foot up off the ground, worked almost like a loading dock.
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W. eWatson wrote:

Lower the tail gate then back up real fast and slam the brakes on. It should slide right out.
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the tools are probably all over the place inside the box.

near a sturdy tree,tie rope around tree and toolbox. drive truck SLOWLY away from tree until the toolbox is partway off the tailgate,then put ramp in place and slide toolbox down ramp. you can brace yourself against a wheelwell and use your LEGS to push box the rest of the way.Or you could use a cheap "comealong" to haul it out.
you could make a simple wheeled platform that's level with the truck bed,and slide the toolbox onto that.Then tip it over to get the toolbox onto it's casters.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
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