Get rid of your ladder

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Did you notice the "working height" disclaimer (normal height individual)? The platform lifts only lifts to 7'7".
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There are plenty of locations in the shop where a stepladder will have too large a footprint and an extension ladder has nothing to be leaned against. You may also be using two hands to work on a fitting or control so standing on a platform is much safer than standing on a ladder. Lifting a 30# damper into place is much easier off a lift than a ladder.
Yes, it would also be safer changing six tubes in a fixture compared to a ladder as they can all be put into the cage before going up. With a ladder, you'd need either two people or make multiple trips up and down carrying the glass tubes. Changing a ballast is another example. Yes, it can be done from a ladder, but it is safer from a lift cage. Safety is important to us and standing on a 3' square platform in a cage is always better than standing on a 6" wide rung of a ladder when you need two hands. This is especially true working over a machine where you have to reach a bit to the side. A simple lean in a cage versus a dangerous lean off a ladder. No, you cannot move the ladder either as it is over a machine.
I was easily able to justify buying the $5000 lifts (used price) we have now so spending the $2200 for this is no big deal. .
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Ed Pawlowski wrote: ...

Unfortunately, doesn't appear this lift would help resolve that problem although does help w/ the no-wall situation and extension. (I'm fully in agreement w/ all other points--the $5K I spent for the 40-ft boomlift while not a vertical interior lift as these has been worth 10X that outlay.)
--
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Not sure which lifts you got, but all of the various styles I have used have been significantly more capable than this little unit appears to be.
The scissor lift type units are available with platforms that telescope on one end to provide overhang access, and the platform size along with the self propelled nature allow for very efficient lamp replacement throughout a facility.
There are some very nice mini boom lifts with combination lower boom elevation and upper boom telescoping, along with base rotation that provide tremendous reach capabilities in a small footprint self propelled unit.
There are simple vertical only, manual propulsion and outrigger units that provide much better working height capacity than this little drill powered unit. Possibly Genie has some design patents on them that have caused JLG to resort to this feeble angle column design to try to get some of that market share.
Then there is the good old rolling scaffold platform which works well in a lot of cases, provides more platform area, and takes less storage space when disassembled.
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We have what you describe. The price difference is huge though and the use depends on your needs. The smaller lift can be moved easily by one person into small spaces. The larger lifts have to be move by self power or by a fork lift to another elevation. They don't do steps very well. We have one location that can be accessed only by a typical 36" door at a walkway or a set of 6 stairs and the ceiling height is 16'. Getting a tall ladder in there is a real bitch of a time.

They all have places where they work well, other places not so well. Depends on your needs.
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re: So, what advantage would it have over a normal stepladder of the same working height?
The old Varsity softball field at my daughter's school was right next to the building. Video's of the game were shot from the single story roof behind home plate.
The new field is "out in the open", far from the buildings, with no place for the cameraman to "perch". Video's are now shot from ground level.
I may suggest to the Sports Boosters that they raise some funds to purchase one of these lifts to improve the quality of the videos. It could also be used for the other sports that don't have elevated locations to film from.
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DerbyDad03 wrote: ...

Sounds like a place to get the local rental outfit(s) to make some charitable contributions of donated rental time. I'd think this puppy wouldn't be stable enough for that purpose, likely, but one of the scissor lifts would do quite nicely.
--
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dpb wrote:

Having spent a number of years shooting sports videos and used a number of setups for aerial shots, by far the cheapest and easiest setup is standard panel frame scaffolding. The trick to having a stable shot is to use a couple of the basic 1" wide ratchet straps to pre-tension the scaffolding and eliminate the usual wiggle you get.
Scaffolding also has the advantage of being inexpensive which can allow you to setup scaffold platforms for an entire season of games if the facility allows it. We were able to do this for one baseball series where we were able to erect scaffolding behind the backstop fencing and in front of the facilities press box / concession building in such a way that it provided a huge 4'x17' platform at 18' high which gave a great shot angle and also did not interfere with the view from the press box.
The scissors lifts are nice, however they also have inherent wiggle in their joints, and unlike scaffolding, there isn't any viable way to pre-tension and eliminate the wiggle.
I've also used standard bucket trucks, which work well, but have the disadvantages of only being able to be used where you can get the truck parked, and not allowing the camera person to readily lock off a cover shot and come down for a break.
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DerbyDad03 wrote:

I think 2-3 telephone poles with a tree house on top would likely be cheaper. Have to make the bottom 8 feet of ladder removable or enclose it in wire mesh when not in use, to eliminate the attractive nuisance factor. Some budding Eagle Scout would probably be happy to do it for his final project.
Don't know if they still do, seeing as how they now have all those miniature droid cameras that can be strung up on wires and controlled remotely. But for several years at Indy, they used to bring in a long-reach manlift, almost a crane, and trap a cameraman OVER the track on the main straightaway. Platform was guyed off in 4 directions to keep it from flapping around. Poor SOB up there probably had to stop drinking coffee 24 hours before the race, to make it 200 laps.
They did let him down during rain delays. Metal boom, and all that.
--
aem sends...

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aemeijers wrote:

Good remote servo pan/tilt heads and remote lens controls on compact cameras have made a lot of that type of staging obsolete for productions that have real budgets. The equipment is expensive though, so the little local productions have to rely on the old techniques.
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Pete C. wrote:

I don't think 'budget' is a problem at Indy, even with all the drama queen theatrics in open-wheel racing the last decade or two...
But yeah, a local high school, unless they got a big grant somewhere, is probably using whatever cast-off equipment they can scrounge, that the local TV station took a tax write-off on. (although I have seen writeups on some of the fancy radio-tv studios some of the high schools in rich zip codes have, that look nicer than what a lot of college stations have.)
--
aem sends...

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[crap snipped]
Figgin' spammer.
I'll see your lift, and raise you.
Preview:
http://preview.tinyurl.com/2bkophd
Or not:
http://tinyurl.com/2bkophd
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Not really, you don't know me.

Interesting, but not the same in terms of cost. It has a purpose between the cheaper manually moved lift and a full sized scissor lift.
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wrote:

Very nice design and idea. At $2K, it looks reasonable enough to pay more for the extra safety. I still need a 28-foot ladder to reach the roof.
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But if you put the ladder in the lift you could go to 42 feet
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

A used utility truck and bucket would be cheaper.
--
LSMFT

If I wasn't me I wouldn't like me either..........
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