Generators Revisited

Page 4 of 4  
wrote:

Here's a cupla idears:
Sort of along the OP's post, why not make the inverter installation permanent? A conveneient way to do this, without encumbering the battery or its terminals, is to get what electricians call "bugs" which attach right onto a wire, midspan, without cutting it. The wires you splice in (mebbe thin-ish welding cable to the inverter, very flexible) could be fused/switched as well, altho the main fuse on the car may take care of this.
Run some wires to the car cabin, so you have 120 V in there to use, and a heavy-duty receptacle(s) for extension cords to the house, if they are not already on the inverter.
Then, it should be plug'n'play, whenever an outtage occurs, and you'll have 120 V inside the car, as well.
--
EA



> But I've only had one multi-day outage here in 15 years.
> Big freak windstorm took out many lines. About 72 hours.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I'm sure some people are able to do that. I remember one inverter I bought, sternly telling me not to mount it under the hood of my car. Well, never mind that otherwise good idea. I'm guessing a car alternator can put out a useful bit of current. And, that you fill the fuel by driving the car to the gas station (where they have power).
For my power cut needs at home, I've got a little generator, and some gas oil mix in my chain saw box.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
When I looked into inverters I saw contractors using them for on-site 120v tools, and one guy in rural Canada who powered his furnace and a few other things during an outage or outages. What stopped me was the lugging and connectability issues to my car. You need heavy lugs and cabling from your car battery, and that's runs up the cost by a surprising amount. Then you have to consider how to conceal that stuff and/or make the connections when you need them. I still like the idea, but it takes some thought and study to set it up right. But I've only had one multi-day outage here in 15 years. Big freak windstorm took out many lines. About 72 hours. In the end the easier more cost-effective option for me is to do nothing, and roll with what comes. I really like the "get out of town" option best. But the problem with that is knowing how long the outage will last. They didn't even start projecting restored service until about 24 hours in, then they were a 1-3 days off with the projections. That's what made it bad for us. Not knowing when the power would come back. I kept remembering this http://www.hulu.com /#!watch/281936
Can't help the 15 second ad. That's how it goes now on much of the internet.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
the easier more cost-effective option for me is to do

The get out of town might not be a bad idea in some locations. If it is winter time and the power goes out for several days and no heat,the water pipes may burst. While the insurance may take care of it, it is still going to be lots of trouble to deal with. That is one reason to stay home and keep the home fires burning so to speak.
While I do not burn it very much, there is a wood stove in the basement and a small ammount of wood to last a week or two if needed.. Also a small 5 kw generator I have had for over 10 years,but never hooked it to the house. I was going to one time,but the thing would not start. The power came back on in a few hours that day.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
A gentle reminder, perhaps this week is the right time to haul that generator out, and see if you can get it to run? I'm guessing if it fights you, perhaps your friends and neighbors can help.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Also a small 5 kw generator I have had for over 10 years,but never hooked it to the house. I was going to one time,but the thing would not start. The power came back on in a few hours that day.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

After cleaning out the carborator three times, I now use the Stabil in the gas and start it every time I mow the grass. I found that if I start it when I use the leaf blower to blow the grass off the driveway and walks, that is about the right ammount of time to let it run to really warm up. Also I take a drill or saw or other device out to it and plug it in to make sure the generator part is putting out. I have heard that sometimes the generator will not put out any current if it is not ran under some load from time to time. The generator stays outside in a 4 foot each way 'dog house' that I built. It sits on some concreter blocks and also the top is on a hinge so I can run it with the top and one side open for cooling.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You have my respect. I'm no where near as well prepared.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
After cleaning out the carborator three times, I now use the Stabil in the gas and start it every time I mow the grass. I found that if I start it when I use the leaf blower to blow the grass off the driveway and walks, that is about the right ammount of time to let it run to really warm up. Also I take a drill or saw or other device out to it and plug it in to make sure the generator part is putting out. I have heard that sometimes the generator will not put out any current if it is not ran under some load from time to time. The generator stays outside in a 4 foot each way 'dog house' that I built. It sits on some concreter blocks and also the top is on a hinge so I can run it with the top and one side open for cooling.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote in message > In the

Exactly what I was talking about. Now imagine if it was a fancy-schmancy Generac, all solid state, and Generac refused to come out.... not sumpn your neighbor can help you with.
Which is another thing I meant to mention to Han.... the *complexity* of these standby's is just too much. That's why I went with a BlackMax, that I could hook up myself, with no black-boxedness to it beyond the voltage regulator.
--
EA

>
>
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Atila Iskander wrote:

What is the recommended pipe diameter to feed a generator using natural gas? I suspect 1/4" would be too small, but would 1" be overkill?
I found a NG space heater at an auction ($10) and that's providing the incentive to re-plumb a gas line to supply the master bedroom. While I'm at that task, it would be straightforward to extend the new gas line around the house corner to the vicinity of the electrical distribution system where I plug in my generator.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/2/2012 8:10 AM, HeyBub wrote:

Most residential gas meters have a regulator mounted with them that is set for 6-8" WC "water column" which is about 1/2 psi. This requires a 3/4" line for most stoves, furnaces and water heaters. When I was installing a lot of generators in homes and businesses, I would get the gas company to install a 2psi gas meter so I could get enough gas pressure and volume to run the generators. The Generac units I was installing needed 11" WC to operate properly and because of the higher supply pressure, I could run a 1/2" line to get the volume of fuel needed. My friend and I when installing gas lines in new construction or remodels would get a 2psi gas meter so we could run 3/8" copper lines to all appliances instead of 3/4" but a regulator was needed at each unit to regulate the pressure down to 6-8" WC for proper operation. I installed a wall mounted NG heater here at the crotchety old fart's lair last year and I ran a 1/2" copper line as required, it works great and puts out a great deal of heat. You may be able to use a 3/4" line to supply enough fuel for your genset as many of them will operate with the the 6-8" WC NG supply. ^_^
TDD
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The Daring Dufas wrote:

Thanks.
I'll try 3/4" for my modest 6000kw generator. If that doesn't work, I'll try 1". If I still have problems. I'll investigate up-amped regulators (or forget the whole thing).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/2/2012 2:33 PM, HeyBub wrote:

I believe a contractor type portable generator I converted to NG for a homeowner was a 6kw and it worked OK with a 1/2" line but your 6 million watt generator would require a really big gas line. ^_^
TDD
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

He could tap into mine if he was a little closer. The gas line at the bottom of my driveway is 36" in diameter, and 1000 p.s.i. House is 300 yards away, still within the 100% instant kill radius if the thing ever decides to blow up.
But yeah, I'm thinking 6000kw is a little robust even for Texas.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/2/2012 9:36 PM, Smitty Two wrote:

I've worked on some fairly large generators like a 400kw pulled by a tractor trailer and some of the power plants on the islands had big EMD diesels. Heck there was one very old one that had a ship's diesel engine running it. It made a very interesting "POK ah POK ah POK ah" sound as it ran. I've never laid hands on a genset as big as a one megawatt much less a six megawatt unit. ^_^
TDD
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Well in Texas, you're expected to think big
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If you don't want to make it a permanent installation, another option may be to have a gas outlet like you would connect a grill to and then use a 3/4" hose to connect it to the generator when needed. You can get those hoses in various diameters and lengths, custom made. They are typicall sold for use with RV's, etc.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/3/2012 10:07 AM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Restaurant supply houses sell quick connect gas line sets for appliances in commercial kitchens because the equipment often must be rolled away from walls for cleaning. ^_^
TDD
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

My last installation was a kitchen stove I used flex-pipe instead of black pipe The cost difference between (the suggested) 3/4" and 1" was not worth worrying about, so I ran 1" to the stove.. It will also completely eliminate any fear that you can't run your heater and generator at the same time.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/2/2012 8:10 AM, HeyBub wrote: ...

...
There will be a required pressure/volume specification available from the manufacturer of the generator is the easiest/best way to ascertain that for the specific case.
Of course, the upstream feed has to be able to supply all coincident uses downstream is the limiting factor for multiple.
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.