GE Dishwasher life expectancy?

Today my almost 15-year old GE Potscrubber 1100 seems to have stopped working. The motor didn't seem to start. I can faintly hear it trying, but nothing happens. The detergent compartment opened and the bottom seemed to fill half-way with warm water, but nothing beyond that happened...
Do I need to buy a new one?
Any suggestions?
Thank you.
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On Sat, 22 Sep 2007 22:26:27 +0000, JLF wrote:

Mine would be replace it.
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check for debris in pump, replace dont fix at that age its a loser,
clearing a stuck pump is worth it.
some new dishwashers have extra deep baskets, you can find them the kick panel is very small in height. I just bough a whirpool they are the only maker to have silverware in the door, saving space in the main part of the washer. new dishawshers heat the water which is nice
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" snipped-for-privacy@aol.com" wrote:

In my opinion, it is worth spending 30 minutes on. It should take about 5 minutes to unhook and pull it out from under the counter. In the remaining 25 min, if you can't identify and resolve a problem such as debris in the pump, a mouse jamming a pulley (don't laugh, I had an electric car radiator fan jammed by a big honkin' cicada) or similar, just replace it, they're too cheap to spend any more time on. Go buy another for the $300 at whatever local place you prefer, spend the 30 min to install it, and forget about it for another 15 years.
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Thanks -- I'll give it a look but also start window shopping.
J.
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BTW, I don't think you have the same problem at all, but my drainage problem was a chicken bone in the vacuum break on the sink. Assuming the new dishwasher used a vacuum break too, I probably would have just connected it to the old one, whose chrome cap looked good as new, and whose plastic insides looked almost as good as new, and then the new one wouldn't work either. I hope I'd be smart enough to figure out that it was one of the 2 or 3 parts I didn't replace.

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On Sat, 22 Sep 2007 15:53:40 -0700, " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com"

My Kenmore dishwasher is 28 years old and it heats the water. I think it uses the same heater that it would use to dry the pots, if I didn't just air-dry them.
This was actually a problem when the thing wouldn't drain. I kept running it through the same part of the cycle, 7 to 10 times, and didn't realize that the water, the same water, was getting hotter and hotter and hotter, and eventually it melted a bit one of my two favorite plastic salad bowls. Another two runs the whole thing might have been a lump.
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You don't need to, but you may want to. Repairs can cost from $50 to $250 and get you going, but another component may fail in a day, a week, or a year. At 15, it is beyond normal life expectancy.
As for new models, most anything you buy today will clean as well as the best of 15 years ago. More money does equal more feature, hopefully longer life, but not much in the way of cleaner dishes.
Check you local dealer. Most now belong to buyer's co-ops and can sell at about the same price as the big store and they usually give much better service.
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Two other factors to consider is a new one is likely to use less water than a 15 yr old unit, leading to some energy savings. And new ones are much quieter. I replaced a 20 yr old one recently with a mid range model and the diff in noise level is huge. This one sounds more like a gently water fall. In fact, until you get used to it, it sounds more like water leaking thant the old high pressure sound.
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8-12 years
For a dishwasher, GE wouldn't be the first choice for a quality machine.
Kitchen Aid or Maytag have a better washing design.
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Our JenAire dishwasher has been working flawlessly since 1992. Be glad to see it breakdown soon so I can get something a little quieter.
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As the mad said, (check who makes JenAire)
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I lived with a JenAire over the summer and the utensil placement drove me crazy. they basically had to be placed individually in each little slot. Not for me. Are they supposed to get clean better because of that configuration? Is it designed for people with maids? I don't have the patience put them in one by one.
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trying,
Yours is in the life expectancy of the machine. I've had 2 GE dishwashers and got an average of 15-17 yrs out of them. At this point in time the cost of repair can be up to 1/3 the cost of a new machine. Plus the chance of more frequent breakdowns has significantly increases. Go new not repair. MLD
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I have a similar setup on my Kitchen Aid. Difference is, the slotted lid can be opened to a plain bin if you choose. When we first got it, I though it would be a PITA, but in practice, no problem.
If you like all the other features of the machine, you can just cut the slotted section.
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