gas-oil mix for chain saw

Over the years I acquired an assortment of 2 stroke power tools that needed oil-gas mixtures. One of the first was a Poulan Chain saw, maybe 25 years ago, that I still have. After that have been a variety of weed-eaters and blowers. The Poulan called for 16:1 gas:oil mix. The other stuff varied from around 32:1 to 40:1 or thereabouts. I also used to have an outboard motorboat that used 50:1 ratio.
One time when I went to get a carb rebuild kit for one of the blowers I saw they had some 3.2 oz cans of oil to mix with the gas. I had been mixing more like 4 oz per gallon. I asked the guy if he had any 4 oz cans so it would be the right ratio. He said, "You don't need that anymore, just use these 3.2, it's synthetic and works for everything. So that's what I started using. I had had the Poulan chain saw so long I had forgotten it was supposed to be 16:1 so it, along with everything else was getting this 3.2 oz oil mixed with a gallon of gas. I've never had any problems with any of these things, other then they eventually wear out after a decade (except for the Poulan chain saw which is still working great).
Have I just been lucky in using this 40:1 mix in stuff that has been supposed to have anywhere from a 16:1 to 30:1 mix in it or is what they guy at the small equipment repair place told me true, that the new 3.2 oz oil cans are good for EVERYTHING now?
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Actually, the oils are different. The "50:1" oils are _generally_ synthetics.
Similar to your experience, I've found that a wide variety of 2-strokes, including a 25-year-old Poulan, work just fine with 50:1. And ... no smoke-screen on startup, with minimal muffler deposits. Not to mention much improved air-quality for operator, and one container of mix.
HTH, J
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Ashton,
I believe that you got good advice from on using the synthetic 2 cycle oil. Just remember to break in new equipment on traditional oil and mix ratios before using your synthetic mix.
My friends and I switched over to high ratio synthetic mixes for our huge assortments of 2 cycle engines and none of us have had any problems.
Good luck, Gideon
========= Ashton Crusher wrote in message ... Over the years I acquired an assortment of 2 stroke power tools that needed oil-gas mixtures. One of the first was a Poulan Chain saw, maybe 25 years ago, that I still have. After that have been a variety of weed-eaters and blowers. The Poulan called for 16:1 gas:oil mix. The other stuff varied from around 32:1 to 40:1 or thereabouts. I also used to have an outboard motorboat that used 50:1 ratio.
One time when I went to get a carb rebuild kit for one of the blowers I saw they had some 3.2 oz cans of oil to mix with the gas. I had been mixing more like 4 oz per gallon. I asked the guy if he had any 4 oz cans so it would be the right ratio. He said, "You don't need that anymore, just use these 3.2, it's synthetic and works for everything. So that's what I started using. I had had the Poulan chain saw so long I had forgotten it was supposed to be 16:1 so it, along with everything else was getting this 3.2 oz oil mixed with a gallon of gas. I've never had any problems with any of these things, other then they eventually wear out after a decade (except for the Poulan chain saw which is still working great).
Have I just been lucky in using this 40:1 mix in stuff that has been supposed to have anywhere from a 16:1 to 30:1 mix in it or is what they guy at the small equipment repair place told me true, that the new 3.2 oz oil cans are good for EVERYTHING now?
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Thanks for the feedback. Seems to be a safe approach.

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