gas line for stove

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I may be looking for a new home...moving to NC. My personal preference is to cook with gas. I really hate electric stoves. Someone told me that even if the home has gas coming into it, for heating, it is hugely expensive to have a line run for a stove.
Is this true? Don't want to get my heart set on being able to do this if it cost too much. I know the cost has to do with the cost of labor in the region but maybe some of you could give me a rough idea. Are we talking under a $1000? $3000? Is this something only a gas company person should do? And would I have to multiply it by 2 if I wanted a line for a gas clothes dryer?
Thanks in advance for you opinion, Bonnie in NJ
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wrote:

make your measurements for Black Pipe and run your own lines. I did this myself and the cost was for materials only: about $50 ( fifty dollars ). Use teflon pipe dope for the connections: No TAPE! Teflon pipe dope.
What's with this thousands of dollars baloney. Use pipe hangers to secure the pipes into position. IOW, get some *guy* friend/neighbor to do this. It takes about an hour once you have the stuff cut to length and threaded at Ace Hardware.
Be sure to include a shut-off valve to meet code. The valve should be AT the stove.
Lg Chicago
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wrote:

<snip>
It depends on the type of house construction and how far the line has to be run. If the house has a basement without a finished ceiling, and the gas line to the furnace is not far from the kitchen location, this is not a big job.
If the house is built on a slab (no basement or crawl space), and the kitchen is far from the gas line, then it is more difficult.
A crawl space or a basement with all finished ceilings is somewhere in between.
Hard to estimate $$ as it depends on the above plus local labor rates, but once you know the above information, a call or two to local plumbers should get you a ballpark. For the first situation (unfinished basement, existing gas line to furnace runs near kitchen) it should be well under $1000 in most areas. Pretty much the same deal for a gas dryer line.
HTH,
Paul
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In

You've given me a lot of helpful info. I am definately not comfortable doing this myself. With my luck I'd cause the house to blow up. Now I know what info I need when I make my calls for an estimate. thanks Paul.
bonnie
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Paul Franklin wrote:

have a slab on grade house, Gas line runs through attic. MC
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It cost me $450 (here outside Chicago) for a plumber to add a gas stove tap, and move the dryer over a couple of feet. About 4 hours work, as the pipe was right close.
Of course, in this case the existing pipe has to be taken apart and the new pieces fitted in. A pro plumber should have the tool to cut and thread pipe, so it isn't that big a thing. Just ask them if they work with black gas pipe when you call for an estimate.
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Bonnie Jean wrote:

We just had a gas line run for a new gas range for $500, including permit. We have an unfinished basement so the installation was not particularly troublesome. Most places we called charged by the foot (length of the gas line). Get mulitple bids for the work- we had bids of $500, $700, and $1000.
Neil
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Wow, I should install gas lines as a side job.
Granted, hiring a professional means he's insured if anything goes wrong. But this isn't rocket science. I recently ran a gas line for my dryer (the old line was done improperly) in under an hour. I just shut off the gas at the meter. After turning it back on you just have to check for leaks and relight any appliances with pilots (in my case just the water heater).
Mike
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upand_at snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Hiring a professional also means not having to deal with the permit and inspection. But permitting is a whole nuther thread. Our job involved a lot more than just the gas line for the stove, but it's true that it isn't hard to run a line yourself.
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Yep, you really should. Be sure to get a pipe table, threader, nipple tray, bunch of pipe wrenches, insurance, and of course a gas detector for when you're through so you can check for leaks.
Shouldn't be more than $5,000 or so to get started. Have at it.
--

Christopher A. Young
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Get your licence, and liability..cause here in NC if you aint got it, you aint doing it...LOL
BTW... Breakdown of a typical install.
1-Secondary Regulator, .5lbs. $70 2-Permits $40 3-25 Feet Stainless Steel line $50 4- Shut off valve approved by state $10 5-Stainless fittings, 2 required $20 6-Misc fittings $10 7-labor 2 hours min, estimated $150
Not too bad really...when you consider that if it leaks, you wont pass, if something happens for the first 3 years after the installation, you are liable for it here...ONLY if it can be traced back to the original install, and then part of it falls back on the inspection official..either way, our insurance pays for it. It can be more....or less even than that...I ran one the other week for under $300...just depends on the situation. NC is a strange state with some of the regs, but I agree, it aint rocket science..so why do we see some really forked over installs? LOL

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wrote:

If you dont have gas coming in, it could be very costly. If you do have gas in the house, there is mst likely a gas stove pipe where a person would likely put the stove. If not, putting in some black pipe is not all that difficult, or a plumber should not take too many hours. Of course it all depends on location in the house, length of pipe, etc, If you want prices, call a plumber. Asking for prices on a newsgroup is assenine, since every location and every business is different. You might find a reliable handyman to do the work too. Gas pipe is much easier to work with than plumbing because it dont normally rust together.
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"You might find a reliable handyman to do the work too. Gas pipe is much easier to work with than plumbing because it dont normally rust together."
Yeah, but if you screw it up, instead of a leak you can get a big BOOM! A gas pipe installation is probably the last thing a homeowner should turn over to a "handyman."
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On 7 Dec 2005 16:35:08 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

There are two kinds of handyman. Good ones and bad ones. I was in that business for many years, and I always did my work properly and according to the codes.
Some pros do crappy work too...
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"There are two kinds of handyman. Good ones and bad ones. I was in that business for many years, and I always did my work properly and according to the codes.
Some pros do crappy work too... "
And are you licensed to do gas work? Do you get a permit? And what happens when the handyman job burns the house down and the insurance company starts to ask those questions before paying the claim?
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Because of the odor they add to the gas, the human nose is a pretty good detector of natural gas. But yes, if you have any doubts, don't fool with it.
After I had the gas work done inside, I noticed once in a while, a faint odor of gas near the meter, so I called the gas co. To summarize, gas valves can leak if they have been used after a long period of inactivity, and they have to be greased to fix the leak.
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wrote:

If you dont have gas coming in, it could be very costly. If you do have gas in the house, there is mst likely a gas stove pipe where a person would likely put the stove. If not, putting in some black pipe is not all that difficult, or a plumber should not take too many hours. Of course it all depends on location in the house, length of pipe, etc, If you want prices, call a plumber. Asking for prices on a newsgroup is assenine, since every location and every business is different. You might find a reliable handyman to do the work too. Gas pipe is much easier to work with than plumbing because it dont normally rust together.
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In

I gleened from other posts that the cost will vary by location and the length of pipe required for the job. And from some of the posts I WAS able to get an idea of the cost...at least that it would be in my affordable range. So it wasn't such an asinine question. It's really not necessary nor nice to say that to someone anyway. If you think the question is dumb, just move on to the next thread next time. Bonnie
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The one time I ran a gas line for some folks stove, it came out about $150. The other time when my boss (and company) ran a gas line to hook up a fireplace, it was $300. Call a couple heating and AC companies, and ask them. Or appliance companies. Or plumbers.
Not times two for the dryer --c ause they will be onsite with tools already.
--

Christopher A. Young
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Right, and depending on location, the stove may be a branch of the dryer run.
Even if you don't get the dryer right away, you may want the branch run now to avoid a lot of work (and money) later. The gasfitter or plumber will run the dryer line and cap it off at some place saving a lot of labor to break into a line when the time comes to add it. .
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