Gas Barbeque - cast alumnum - peeling finish

I have an old Structo gas fired barbeque which has a cast aluminum lid / hood and firebox.
The finish on this thing appears to be a flat black paint.
On the inside top of the hood / lid, and on the outside top, too, the paint is peeling badly. There is also some peeling, but nowhere near as much nowhere near as much, on the bottom outside of he firebox
I have seriously pressure washed all of the unit.
I have disassembled the unit from the legs, and disassembled all the support parts and have already sanded, wire brushed, primed with Rustoleum Red "lead" primer and put a finish coat of Rustoleum Gloss Black on all the support parts.
I am ready to do something with the fire box and the hood / lid. The question is, "What"?
In am open to any ideas any one has about refinshing the exterior repeat exterior of the firebox and hood / lid.
I have pint can of a "Temproof" brand "1200 Degree F. Stove Paint". I can throw that in the spray gun and spray it.
I also acquired somewhere two rattle cans of a "Zynolyte" brand "Bar-B-Q-Black" paint which is also supposedly good to 1200 degrees.
I haven't used either of these products yet.
Has anybody here any experience redoing the finish on a cast aluminum gas fired barbeque?
Has anybody here any experience using either of the two products mentioned above on a cast aluminum gas fired barbeque?
TIA.
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Jim McLaughlin

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The 1200 degree paint works fine, a few years ago I redid my grill the paint has held up well. ONLY use on the outside!!!!
I saved LOTS of cleaning work:) Disassembled my grill put the parts in my self cleaning oven. They came pout looking like new:)
It was amazing no scraping wire brushing etc...
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Thanks for the testimonial abou the 1200 degree paint.
I planned on only doing the outside surfaces. I am reluctant to put paint on a surface that will be over or under food that is cooking.
The "Temproof" pint's label say that it can be used inside ovens, etc., so long as it is "cured" by a low heat baking for a couple of hours. Regardless, I think I'll just skip paintng the insides.

I like your idea about the self clean oven trick. Where were you and your bright ideas three days ago when I started this project? <G>
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Jim McLaughlin

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All you had to do was ASK:)
Its common knowledge doesnt everyone know thats how you clean grills:)
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Jim McLaughlin wrote:

I used exhaust manifold paint from the auto parts store and it worked well for me. Some interesting colors available. :-)
--
Joseph Meehan

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"Jim McLaughlin" <jim.mclaughlin> wrote in

Using a wire brush and coarse sandpaper to remove all paint if possible. Dust the aluminum and clean off the aluminum with mineral spirits. Use a few coats of any name brand 1200 degree stove paint.
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