garage door opener... sensor beams?

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xrongor wrote:

The door is much less dangerous with the sensor beam because it's the only non-contact safety mechanism, unlike the motor time-out and the force sensor, neither which is nearly as sensitive.
Several years ago, I installed a Chamberlain-made Sears opener, and during testing it once failed to stop the door from closing while the sensor beam was blocked. Then a child in a town 40 miles away was killed by an opener (brand unknown), and this encouraged me to do more testing, which eventually duplicated the initial failure. I returned the opener to Sears and told them it was defective. It turned out there was a design flaw that made the opener pick up false signals from the wall pushbutton, which was connected to the same wires as the sensor beam (different voltage levels used to distinguish them). I then bought a Stanley opener and was unable to make it fail, except to make its motor thermal cutoff open up, no matter what I tried. Its force sensor could also be adjusted for much higher sensitivity without the door friction or weight causing false triggering.
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so, to be clear, this was a case of someone getting hurt by a FAULTY UNIT that actually already HAD AN ELECTRONIC EYE. a specific design flaw to a particular model. not anything really to do with the basic design of garage door openers in general.
and now we have to have electronic eyes on all of them. is anybody really safer? doubtful.
randy
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xrongor wrote:

I don't know any details of the opener that killed the child, nor did I mention if it was defective, wrongly installed, or had an electric eye.

You're jumping to conclusions without sufficient evidence, and I do know of an opener that was safer because of an electric eye. Its safety-reverse microswitch had fallen off due to a crack in the gearbox housing, and I had previously added a homemade electric eye circuit.
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On Sun, 01 May 2005 20:43:53 +0000, Joseph Meehan wrote:

What if there are no "neighbor kids" where you live?
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Just as an FYI, the consumer product safety commision has a report on garage door incidents. Between 1996 and 2003, 64 children were killed and 49 were injured from garage doors. Like it says above, your insurance company may have a strong opinion on the matter.
http://www.cpsc.gov/volstd/garage/gdoupdate.pdf
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i bet more kids choked on peas or chicken and died that year.
the insurance company has a strong opinion in the matters of making money.
randy

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I never thought the sensors were worthwhile either..... but the other day the garage door was about 6" from closing, I opened the entrance door to the house, the kittens ran out.... door is about 4" off the ground now.... under the door they went and the door stopped and reversed. Otherwise, there would have been kitten juice running all down the driveway.
Now, I understand this could be a happy or sad story depending upon your personal views with respect to cats. However, my point is that you just never know what can happen.
Another thing to consider is that most doors are supposed to reverse if they encounter a blockage before fully closing. I look at those eyes as a backup to that safety - in other words I don't have to worry about ruining the door/motor if I leave a 2x4 or something laying in the path of the door.
To answer your question, I would guess that of the 2 sensors, one is wired with power, and the other is the "switch". Determine which is which, and then determine if the "switch" is normally open or normally closed, and then short or leave the leads open as required. But this is just a WAG on my part.
I'd think it would be easier to just install em.
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