Garage door opener

The two laser units on the tracks for my garage door were damaged when our garage flooded and then froze during the winter. These are a safety feature but with no small children around, I don't consider it necessary. Is there any way of by-passing them? I tried twisting the wires to- gether on each side. It didn't work. Then I joined the respective wires from one side to the other across the opening. That didn't work either. The laser beam is essentially a switch, isn't it? If I can't bypass it, do I have to order the manufacturer's replacement equipment (which will take time) or is there something "generic' I can use? Tx ds
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Some work simply by disconnecting. You need to check the wiring diagram that came with the opener. IF you bypass it, make SURE the downforce limit is adjusted properly.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I've not encountered one that will work without them in the circuit wired properly.
s
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On Thu, 07 May 2009 23:52:54 -0500, Steve Barker

I found out last week that Martin Garage Door company has developed an opener without the need for the sensors.
"Exclusive Soft-Touch Reverse Technology™
While Closing: • The door & opener system reverses with just a soft touch- eliminating the need for troublesome photo eyes
While Opening:
• The door & opener system will stop with just a soft touch- eliminating the appeal for children to ride the door while it opens "
http://www.martindoor.com/Garage-Doors-Openers/Garage-Door-Openers.aspx
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DS wrote:

the sensors will be replaced for free if you contact the mfgr. until then you'll just have to hold the button to lower the door. raising will be normal. When you get them back you can mount them 6" apart on the ceiling right above the unit, and they'll never be damaged again.
steve
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DS wrote:

I doubt they're lasers but instead one is an LED transmitter and the other is a phototransistor receiver, and you should be able to repair them by opening them up, washing them thoroughly with alcohol, and letting them dry for several hours in a warm place before putting them back into service. Sometimes the only problem caused by flooding is silt build-up on the optical parts. All but the oldest garage door openers are designed to not allow the door to be closed if the signal from the optical receiver can't be detected, so of course merely cutting the wires or connecting them together won't work, and the latter could damage the overhead unit. Damage to the electronics in the optical sensor and transmitter should be inexpensive to repair since only generic parts are used in them, and I would expect any parts related to them in the overhead unit to be the same, but it's much more hazardous to work on it since some of the circuitry runs at high voltage, and a careless person could easily get shocked (to death), lose a finger, or even be scalped if the opener starts to move unexpectedly.
Almost all openers are made by Chamberlain (Liftmaster, Sears Craftsman) or Genie, and parts are readily available from them, opener service companies, and retailers.
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    I like Steve's comment that they can be replaced for free.
    I strongly urge you to get them working and fully functional as they were designed. Remember that while you may not have any young children, other people do, including relatives and neighbors. In addition animals and adults with limited mobility can be injured by these doors as might someone who you might sell you home to some time later.
    Not only could there be a preventable accident, but you could be held responsible. I don't know about your insurance, but if I were an attorney for someone who was injured I would love to find out that the owner had intentionally defeated the safety device that might have saved that child's life.
Between March 82 and November 96, 62 children under 15 have been reported killed by garage doors.
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

There is something more dangerous to small children:
http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/5006.html
Everything is deadly.
TDD
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"The Daring Dufas"

Another example of the dangers of dihydrogen monoxide poisoning. We really need to regulate that poison more carefully to save the children.
Jon
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The Daring Dufas wrote:

OH GAWD! now we're gonna have electronic sensors on buckets. But still no parental supervision is required.
s
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

that number is a mere nothing. We spend all this time, technology, money, political crap for 4.4 deaths a year. I wonder how many kids are killed or maimed by pit bulls, or wolf dogs? We don't do a dam thing about those. In either event it all boils down to proper parental supervision. if those 62 had been properly supervised, they'd still be alive. Period.
s
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On Fri, 08 May 2009 14:59:39 -0500, Steve Barker

    When did garage door openers come into common use? When did the safety devices come into use? Now do the math. How many did not die that would have otherwise?
    4.4 deaths a year might seem small to you, but if it was your child, you would likely fee different about it. At least I would hope you would. I suspect you might also feel different it it Was a neighbors child and your garage.
    The devices are not expensive. Some people intentionally defeat them which means they are going out of their way to make their garage door less safe. What could possibly be in their head?
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

What if I reveled in my neighbor's brattish child being maimed by a falling garage door? Would that be sufficient reason to legislate AGAINST safety devices?
It is poor governance to make laws based on how one might feel.
Unless you're a progressive, of course.
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On Fri, 08 May 2009 14:59:39 -0500, Steve Barker

injured either. My door will reverse as soon as it hits something - and NO beam-switches.
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Mounted my sensor eyes pointing at each other in the attic using the optional rafter-mount kit. ;-) No more problems with sensors!!

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J.A.Michel wrote:

the standard screws holding them to the ceiling is sufficient. ACTUALLY you COULD just duct tape them together and lay them on top the unit if you're real lazy. Anything to keep them out of the way.
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