Gap in sidewalk

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On Tuesday, November 18, 2014 9:16:23 PM UTC-5, TomR wrote:

No, if you read his description, he clearly says the sidewalk has not sunken down, there is just a horizontal gap. And I think what appears to be an inch or two height difference is actually a lot bigger, ie a normal step up height difference between sidewalk and porch.
I think that the exposed "gap" that we

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wrote:

Repairing it seems like a good idea to me. Is this a situation where you should put in a foam "snake", cylinder (I forget the real name), so that you'll only need some caulk and it won't fill up some hole under the cement?

You should find out more about this, starting with the documents and then with neighbors you have a good relationship with. Have you read your documents? Mine are Articles of Incorporation, and Bylaws. Yours may be named something else. They should cover this, and probably lots of other things you'll find woth knowing. .

I don't think that's "the purpose". Furthermore, I don't think a condo association has to be arranged that way. It might be, if the builders think it will make the properties sell better, but it's not required. People are free to contract in any way they want that's not illegal. If the formers of his condo association decided it would only take care of common areas, they could do that. And the members could amend the rules later.
The way to know is to read the documents. If someone doesn't have a copy of the documents, he should be able to get a copy from a neighbor, possibly from the association, and for a dollar a page maybe, from the County Clerk or whoever keeps property records. (Maybe these days he can download them for free.)
The difference between a condo and a co-op is that a condo is real property and a co-op is a share in a corporation that a) owns the whole property and b) includes the right to live in one of the units. Various things, including local and state laws, contribute to the decision whether to set up houses or apartments as condos or co-ops.

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On Tuesday, November 18, 2014 3:17:45 PM UTC-5, micky wrote:

Backer rod. It can be found either in the concrete supply section or where the weatherstripping stuff is.

It can be one of the purposes, especially in rural areas, where there are lawns, landscaping, etc. There are people that don't want those hassles.
Furthermore, I don't think a condo

It's how all the condos around here are organized. As someone else described, pretty much everything beyond the interior walls are the responsibility of the condo association. Roofs, sidewalks, decks, lawn, landscaping, siding, exterior painting, etc.

All of those should be part of the closing documents and he should have a copy.
But again, it's a small gap in a sidewalk and if he wants to just spend $5 and fix it himself, I'd probably do the same thing.
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wrote:
Norminn, you're back. I started to confuse you with Normin.

Check satellite view of some map site. Your condo has fallen in to a simk hole.
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The OP appears to be in Illinois. He has freeze-thaw cycles. Mortar in that crack wouldn't last long.
Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
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Short of mud jacking or replacing it, I doubt there is anything you can do to fix it permanently.
If it were me - and if the space is wide enough - I'd get some pebbles or crushed rock and fill in with that. I would also dig down 3-4" at each end of the joint and make little dams of mortar to contain the pebbles/crushed rock.
--

dadiOH
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com posted for all of us...

Isn't this the condo assn bailiwick?
--
Tekkie

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wrote:

like slaps - which I would lift and reset in stone fines.
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On Tue, 18 Nov 2014 13:24:13 -0800 (PST), trader_4

Of course.

From what I hear, quite a few people in this n'hood didn't get their documents at closing, although this is an HOA, which has less of a relationship with residents than do condos and co-ops. Does someone from the condo or co-op association attend the closing, usually? He wouldl bring a copy. Because certainly no one** from the HOA here has ever attended. So at the very end of the closing the seller remembered to give me his documents. If he'd forgotten, or forgotten to bring them (If he'd packed them with his other stuff) or if he just didn't care, I'd have had to scrounge them too. Or if he'd only given me part of them.
**Not counting when the developers themselves controlled the HOA.

Yes, for this. But he should get things straight for the next bigger project. And I'm sure you would say, as I did above, Of course.
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On Wednesday, November 19, 2014 10:25:41 AM UTC-5, micky wrote:

No.
He

If I was buying a property with a HOA, I'd get a copy of the HOA documents before even making an offer.

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In

A Google search doesn't help much. For example, here is a link to a list of many different types of Ardex products:
http://www.discountcontractorsupply.com/ardex_concrete_products_s/107.htm?gclid=CPKtt6Wih8ICFSVk7AoddlEA_g
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In typed:

You may be right. If so, and it is actually a horizontal gap, I agree that some flexible caulk would probably be the easiest fix for now. There is a kind of flexible caulk (maybe called "Quad") that comes in a gray color that I have used before and it works well. And, I'm sure that there are flexible concrete crack sealers that also come in a tube.
I do see that there is a normal step height from where the old caulk line is and the top of the concrete porch. I just meant that it looked to me that the sidewalk had dropped down an inch or two below what was the original caulk line -- and the old caulk line is/was at the right location to be at the bottom of a normal step height to the porch. Now, Ihowever, I am not completely sure if the gap is horizontal or vertical -- maybe some side angle photos would help clear that up.
But, you are right that the OP wrote in a follow-up post:
"The concrete moved away from the step, not sunken below."
And, that would support the theory that it is a horizontal (not vertical) gap.
But, the OP also wrote:
"My intention is to fill the gap, not raise or move the concrete. yes there is a water problem where the gutter just empties onto the sidewalk a few feet back. I think you are correct, there is probably not a proper base or footer under the walk."
Some of that sounds more like there is erosion under the sidewalk and that it did drop down over time. So, I am just not sure.
And, if it did drop down, and if it were me, I would also consider just prying up the slab to the right height and putting more dirt etc. underneath. I have done that before may times to fix uneven sidewalks. But, the OP is in a condo association and probably doesn't want to do that kind of work, and would probably prefer just a quick fix with a crack sealer, or mortar/concrete, depending on what is there and what would work best.
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I posted 2 more pics: 1st from directly above (vertical)
http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e347/sidwelle/Walk_04VerticalView_zps358d1a9c.jpg
2nd from almost horizontal.
http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e347/sidwelle/Walk_05HorrizontalView_zps2c229dbb.jpg
The first shows the gap movement away from the step. The 2nd pic shows there may have been 1/4" drop, pic is a little misleading. BTW, it is rain snow mix here.
Thanks
On Monday, November 17, 2014 9:10:58 PM UTC-6, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

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In

Thanks for doing more photos. Since the sidewalk mostly moved away from the step, and may have dropped about 1/4 inch down, I agree with others that suggested to just clean out the gap and fill it with a flexible outdoor caulk. I think it should be a quick and easy job. I'm sure there are concrete crack sealer caulks in Home Depot and Lowes etc, and I would be looking for one that says that it remains flexible. I also think that there is a type of caulk in the caulk and sealant aisles that is called "Quad". That works well. Get it in grey color.
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On Tuesday, November 25, 2014 10:22:53 AM UTC-5, TomR wrote:

Pick up some foam backer rod to fill in most of the gap first too.
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On Monday, November 17, 2014 9:10:58 PM UTC-6, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Last Question: Presently the temps here in IL are in the Upper teens to low 30's. what is the minimum temp needed to use these materials and make them work ? Unusually cold Nov., maybe this should wait until March ?
Thanks
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On Wednesday, November 26, 2014 7:40:58 AM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

The answer to that will be on the tube of the product. You can probably also find it online in the product spec. Most of the common ones I've seen are for 40F and above, not freezing, etc. Also, it's going to take longer to cure at lower temps. You could get some relief by throwing an old coat over it, etc. But if it's in the teens, I'd wait for Spring if using the typical stuff. I'm sure they have others that probably do to lower temps. Also, if you do proceed, make sure to use some backer rod or similar so that the caulk isn't 1" deep. The thicker it is, the longer to cure. Better to put down a couple installments a couple days apart, instead of one thick one.
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