Furring strips ON TOP of my roof shingles?

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I guess that sounds like the way to go. Maybe if I do an hour a night or so I can get it done next summer.
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On Dec 4, 7:14 pm, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Take a look at the tips from FEMA about roofs:
http://www.fema.gov/plan/prevent/howto/how2031.shtm
Note the section where it says if you live in a hurricane prone area to use 6 nails and not staples. Personally, I'd insist on that on my own roof anywhere, as it's far more secure. I saw the same thing happen to shingles at brand new condos 20 years ago during a northeaster. The complex where I was living had nailed shingles with sustained minimal damage. The new place across the street, where they were nailed, had very substantial damage, with whole big sections blown off as you describe.
I also agree with the post that you may have a legal case against the company that installed them, provided the statute of limitations hasn't run out. The obvious negative for you is the amount of time that has expired. However, the fact that you had them back immediately over the 2 years following the work shows that something has been wrong all along. They are the roofing experts, are local, and should know that for a house at the top of a wind blown hill, staples should not be used.
To prevail, you;d need statements from some experts. A certified home inspector would be one good one as he's independent with no axe to grind. A couple of reports from other roofers that said the work was done wrong together with estimates to correct would be good too. Take pictures of everything. You could sue them in small claims where you don't need a lawyer and the limit is usually $2K to $10K depending on state. You probably have a 50-50 shot at winning, but being able to sue at minimal cost could make it worth while.
Good luck
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On Dec 4, 4:53 pm, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Thanks, but can what they said about the price be right?
"A roofing contractor will charge you about $100 to $150 per square foot of roof area to remove and replace shingles and underlayment."
My roof is at least 60x30, not even counting the garage. That's 1800 sq ft, so they are saying it would cost around $200K for a new roof??? Are they figuring in the cost of driving ice all over the country or something?
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

That might be a typo.......should mean "square", perhaps. A "square", in roofing terms, is 100 sq. feet.
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In article <3ec5c103-7a6f-475c-9951-

No, it's not right. They screwed it up.
Should have read either "$100 to $150 per square" (one square = 10' x 10' == 100 square feet), or "$1.00 to $1.50 per square foot".
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Don't know about summer ........ cold weather is not a good time to work, especially for a new roof. For a new roof installation, hot sun helps melt the adhesive built into the shingles so that they lay flat and adhere to each other. If you go about putting adhesive under the tabs, warmth will help make them flex and not crack, but don't kill yourself :o)
There are some roofing material websites which give good instructions about installing shingles. Just the instructions on the package of shingles are pretty much of a "basic education" in roofing. Our Elk shingles are laminated - two layers of stuff stuck together - with the bottom layer only half the size of the shingle. The nailing line, marked on the shingle, is critical as is measuring the overlap, laying a chalk line to get them straight, etc. It isn't rocket science, but sure can give you grief if not done right. I'm not familiar with other brands of roofing, and there is a lot of variety in quality, style and suitability for a particular roof and climate. I looked at Elk's website, just for a random example. I don't know this particular shingle, but the instruction sheet will give you a very good idea of what is involved and why: http://www.elkcorp.com/application_instructions/MyerstownSpecSht.pdf
I would talk to neighbors with similar style roofs that look good and get good references for contractors. Attic ventillation is an important factor, as well. Something to learn about in regard to keeping your roof in good shape.
Good luck.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote in

LOL! I may submit this as a skit for the Red Green Show :-)
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