freon

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Has anyone tried using the freon that you buy for a car AC system in a home centralized AC system? Are there any reliable discussions about this topic on the web. I see some, but don't know who to believe.
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On Mon, 28 May 2012 08:46:07 -0700 (PDT), Deodiaus

The short answer is no R134 is not compatible with R22 or R401(the newer stuff)
How old is the system?
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On May 28, 1:10pm, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I have a YORK EVV 89876 I am guessing it is about 15 years old or so. I have see youtube vids about refilling. I see some people selling R22 on EBay, but only for "certified buyers". I have read a site about using butane. He makes the case that many of use have 5 gallons of gas in our garage which is a lot more dangerous than some butane in the AC system.
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I have read that hydrogen sulfide was used 100 years ago. It stinks like rotten eggs and will knock you out if inhaled in large quantities but supposedly is great and a good lubricant. I have heard that the new ones are dangerous in that they have known to cause heart problems!
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On 5/28/2012 8:19 PM, Deodiaus wrote:

Pre-Freon days ammonia and sulfur dioxide were used as refrigerants. Freons were fairly safe to breath but some caused heart problems when tested on dogs and the newer substitutes are less safe but no where near as toxic as in the pre-Freon days. Toxicity no where approaches that of ammonia or sulfur dioxide.
Concerns with the Freon substitutes were toxicity and effect on refrigerator parts and seals. Latter problem similar to adding alcohol to gasoline's effect on engine components.
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When I was very young, I remember neighbor coming over to put gas in fridge. This was at my grandparents house. Grandmother took me upstairs. Why didn't we go outside. It was a horrible smell. My dad had this old fridge in garage. It had that neat sound when it started up. One day we threw it in the trash on trash day. The workers were putting it in the truck, when suddenly everybody backed off when it started leaking. My dad always said chlorine gas, but I don't guess that's what it was.
Greg
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wrote:

Sounds like an old ammonia fridge. The old Servel absorption fridges were ammonia, for sure.
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The garage fridge, my dad got used in the 50's. It was old then. Had separate motor/ compressor. Had centrifugal starting. Then it sat making a shaking sound, belt driven. Side by side unit. I think it was tossed when I bought them a chest freezer around 1970 . I cant envision that old guy ever being in a kitchen.
I have a gas connection near my electric fridge in my trailer. They also have a vent up in back of the opening. Just got trailer, but the medium sized electric fridge fits well.
Greg
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If you put (flammable) butane in a system designed for non flammable HCFC, you risk explosion from sparks from the compressor motor.
Your system might not be low on charge, in any case. Hard to tell, unless a qualified tech checks it out.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
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I have a YORK EVV 89876 I am guessing it is about 15 years old or so. I have see youtube vids about refilling. I see some people selling R22 on EBay, but only for "certified buyers". I have read a site about using butane. He makes the case that many of use have 5 gallons of gas in our garage which is a lot more dangerous than some butane in the AC system.
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On May 28, 7:31pm, "Stormin Mormon"

How do I find a good and reasonably priced HVAC guy? 3 years ago, a recommended guy ended up upselling me on getting my system cleaned, and turned a $130 repair into a $500 job. Moreover, he did not fix my leak, nor inject a dye to detect leaks the next time. One year Prior to that, at another home, I had the guy out three times trying to fix a problem.
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To find a good A/C technician the simplest thing you can do is to make sure he is licensed by both the state and the EPA. Call him/her first and get all his information to check on him before you make an appointment with him. I am constantly surprised as to how few people do this very simple thing. You can also try finding a very small company that is a sole proprietor where the person holding the license is the same person coming to do the work instead of him sending a fast talking moron. You can also talk to your neighbors and friends and ask them for a recommendation. Instead of trying to find a reasonably priced technician try finding one that personally guarantees his/her work; it will be cheaper in the long run. True: if the system is full of butane there is no air and the butane cannot explode. Then all you have to worry about is air getting into the system and turning it into a pipe bomb.
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On Tue, 29 May 2012 07:58:54 -0700 (PDT), Molly Brown

Slim chance since the pressure inside the system will always be above atmospheric untill it is almost empty. You will have a torch outside the pipe more likely than a bomb inside.
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The EPA does issue certificates, but not licenses.
I think that asking your friends and neighbors for reccomendations is also a good idea.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
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To find a good A/C technician the simplest thing you can do is to make sure he is licensed by both the state and the EPA. Call him/her first and get all his information to check on him before you make an appointment with him. I am constantly surprised as to how few people do this very simple thing. You can also try finding a very small company that is a sole proprietor where the person holding the license is the same person coming to do the work instead of him sending a fast talking moron. You can also talk to your neighbors and friends and ask them for a recommendation. Instead of trying to find a reasonably priced technician try finding one that personally guarantees his/her work; it will be cheaper in the long run. True: if the system is full of butane there is no air and the butane cannot explode. Then all you have to worry about is air getting into the system and turning it into a pipe bomb.
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On Tue, 29 May 2012 13:55:14 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"

And it's not a guarantee that the "licensed" and "certified" guy is going to be any more honest or ethical than a good handiman. No guarantee he will be more knowlegeable about your system either.
Good techs live on their reputation - and that is only as good as the last job - so go for recommendations. A good COMPANY will stand behind repairs done by their techs - while you don't know what to expect if dealing with "just a tech" - but if he's really GOOD, that is not an issue.
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On May 29, 4:50pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

No it isnt a guarantee but if the job hes doing means more to him/ her than just a way to make a buck hes going to go to the trouble and expense of getting a license and a certificate which he can loose if he/she doesnt keep his nose clean. The license and certificate only proves that he is probably serious about his work and knowledge. As far as companies go my personal experience is that the bigger they are the stupider they get. Name one big company and Ill name a whole lot of dumb things it has done.
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On Tue, 29 May 2012 17:33:50 -0700 (PDT), Molly Brown

Note I said a GOOD company - not a BIG one.
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On May 29, 6:43pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

The more technicians a company has on payroll the bigger and cumbersome and hard to quality control it is.
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On Tue, 29 May 2012 18:57:56 -0700 (PDT), Molly Brown

A company where the boss still has his hand firmly in the operation of the company, with up to half a dozen good employees is the "sweet spot" in my opinion.
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Should there be a pool of water under the inside unit. It seems as if it draining off, but the other units do not have water around the indoor unit which houses the blower fan and filter.
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On Mon, 28 May 2012 18:28:55 -0700 (PDT), Deodiaus

Depends. The indoor (evaporator) coil does remove humidity. On a typical day it will have water forming on it, more on humid days, less to none on dry days. The pan should have a drain to take it away. Drain may be partially clogged (very common) or it was a poor installation and collects water before it runs off. I can't see it from here to determine which.
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