Follow-up on next door neighbor

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wrote:

A water pipe is 1/2" or 3/4". A sump pump has a 1-1/4 discharge. The pump should handle it.
Freeze proof outdoor faucets would solve that too. Or just offer to shut off the ones they have now and explain that they need to do these simple things to avoid costly repairs later. Some people just need to be educated and may need a little 'prompting'.

Saturating your basement walls an drain field around the house is not good for BOTH house foundations. You may or may not have water enter your basement, but it's still not a good thing.....
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On Tue, 13 Jan 2015 02:30:32 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

There are two steel beams but they're perpendicular to the front-to-back direction. They hold up the joists. I was quite surprised to see I-beams in my little house. I thought I'd have to buy a skyscraper to own I-beams.

It probably does. My yard definitely goes downhill to the side, but I haven't really checked going straight back. I wasn't here then but I gather my yard and the ones next to me (including his) have a lot of landfill, because I assume originally it was a gradual slope all the way to the stream. Now the stream is suspiciously straight for about 250 yards, and there are actually two levels of stream bed, one 2 or 3 feet deep. which always has some water flowing, and a wider one about 6 feet higher, whose bottom is dry 90% of the time. . I don't think the steep 6 foot hill existed before they put in the fill, which they did in order to have land high enough to build houses. (I guess they did it right. None of my yard has crumbled into the stream bed since they did it, more than 3 decades ago.)
Before they built my row of houses they built a sewer that runs near the stream all the way from downtown where it's a river and empties into the Inner Harbor, upstream at least until the stream peters out,*** about 3 miles upstream. ***You can actually see it where it's just 4" wide and 1" deep. Well you could. It was a big grass field, but 25 years later they may have built a road across that part. My mother lived out there and a couple times I walked home trying to stay close to the stream.
It was sad. Along the route home there were two or three sections of woods, a block wide, maybe 500 feet each, but few or no trails through the woods. In my day, any piece of woods near homes woudl have trails made by children.
I'm told my house and all 100 houses here were built illegally, because the county put a moratorium on building until the sewer was finished, and maybe until something was done to the sewer miles down stream.
My first month here, I road my bicycle downtown, and then road back via a big wild park. It was really hot. I assumed I'd see a gas station to get more water. When that didn't happen, I figured I'd see a house with a garden faucet. When that didn't happen, I figured I'd see a person to ask where I could find water. I finally drank out of the river, 8 miles downstream from my stream. Then 300 yards upstream there was a sign, 6' high and 10 feet wide with big letters: "DO NOT DRINK THE WATER" That's when I realized the big pile of dirt I saw 30 minutes earlier was a sewer that had exploded.
The next day was Monday and I spent the day wondering how long it would take to track down someone who really knew if the water would make me sick. But I didn't try and I didn't get sick.

Ugly but he could do it. He's probably required to bury the 4 feet where the easement is for neighbors to walk behind all the houses.. And from there it's 3 feet to the stream bed, so it would be just as easy to stay underground, and also woudln't put an uphill segment in the pipe.

Oh, no. Trader will tell us the pitfalls of that plan. For starters, I'm reluctant to put a 2" hole in my brick wall, let alone his.

If the HOA doesn't complain. I think once a year in the spring, they walk behind all the houses checking things out, on that easement I mentioned.

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On Tue, 13 Jan 2015 02:43:49 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

Water pressure makes a difference too. I'm pretty sure city pressure is substantially greater than sump pump pressure.

Too late for that now! Plus we're still talking about his house, not mine.

I'm sure you're right. I've had a half dozen different families living in the house next door, and he's the first one who makes me nervous.
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