Folding chair cross bar repair without welding?

One side of the cross bar on the bottom of a metal folding chair broke due to a bad weld. I don't have welding equipment. What is the next best way to fix this?
http://dl.dropbox.com/u/55756213/IMG_0435.jpg
The only solution I can think of is to use an L-bracket and two hose clamps. But there's got to be a better way.
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Drive a dowel in the cross leg pipe and shoot a screw in from the bottom to hold it. Then shoot another screw into the dowel from the other side of the leg.
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Drill a hole in each leg and use a piece of all thread rod. Put a nut on the outside of each leg. Use as small of piece of rod as you can find.
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On 11/23/2012 9:38 PM, bob wrote:

I have welding equipment but some screen wire used as reinforcement and a layer of epoxy worked into it could work if you have no way to drill and cut metal. ^_^
TDD
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How about angle bracket, and a couple self drilling screws?
I wonder if you can get a threaded rod, long enough to go the width of the chair. Drill a hole on either end. Put nylon stop nuts on the ends of the rod, and cut or flex the rod off.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
One side of the cross bar on the bottom of a metal folding chair broke due to a bad weld. I don't have welding equipment. What is the next best way to fix this?
http://dl.dropbox.com/u/55756213/IMG_0435.jpg
The only solution I can think of is to use an L-bracket and two hose clamps. But there's got to be a better way.
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Yes, for a few pennies more than the cost of a bracket, take it to a friend that does have welding equipment. Works best with chair in one hand, six-pack in the other.
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"Ed Pawlowski" wrote in message

Yes, for a few pennies more than the cost of a bracket, take it to a friend that does have welding equipment. Works best with chair in one hand, six-pack in the other
But that would damage the painted service and look bad. The threaded rod looks like the best way. WW
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wrote:

Your car probably looks ugly too since it was welded together. Then there is the rigidity factor.
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> The only solution I can think of is to use an L-bracket and two hose > clamps. But there's got to be a better way.
Building on what Ed Pawlowski suggested, I'd see if there are any trade schools in your area that teach welding to kids that don't intend to go to college.
Trade school instructors are always looking for simple short projects like this so that they can see how their students actually perform in real jobs that they may have to do once they're in the work force.
But, of course, the instructor knows that this same job is going to cost you $25 if you take it to any welding shop, so make him a deal; he gets one of his students to weld the chair back together, and you bring down a $12 box of Krispy Kreme donuts for the whole class to enjoy. Or, you put a $10 bill into the instructors hand to give to the student who does the work. That way, it's a win-win situation on both sides; you get the welding done in a way that it'll last, and the student who does the work gets a $10 bill to take his girlfriend out for a Big Mac.
--
nestork


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If we all did that, the government would starve. You didn't pay sales tax, FICA, deductions, PST, GST, or any of the other revenue streams. But, your chair would work.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Building on what Ed Pawlowski suggested, I'd see if there are any trade schools in your area that teach welding to kids that don't intend to go to college.
Trade school instructors are always looking for simple short projects like this so that they can see how their students actually perform in real jobs that they may have to do once they're in the work force.
But, of course, the instructor knows that this same job is going to cost you $25 if you take it to any welding shop, so make him a deal; he gets one of his students to weld the chair back together, and you bring down a $12 box of Krispy Kreme donuts for the whole class to enjoy. Or, you put a $10 bill into the instructors hand to give to the student who does the work. That way, it's a win-win situation on both sides; you get the welding done in a way that it'll last, and the student who does the work gets a $10 bill to take his girlfriend out for a Big Mac.
--
nestork



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