Flexible gas line

Looking to install a natural gas stove. Home currently uses a LP gas bottle fed stove. City natural gas has been installed into the residence. One section of black pipe has a cap allowing extending the line to the kitchen.
Being an older structure the basement beams don't run symmetrical so extending the black pipe is an option I'd like alternatives to. Flexible CCST seems like a viable option. Gastite products appear to be in line with what I'm considering.
What I haven't found is where do you get custom lengths produced?
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They don't produce custom lengths of factory made flex pipe. In many areas gas installers are approved to install a flexible line that can be run through and around obstructions like PEX water pipe, and terminated on-site by licensed installers, this is what you need.
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Lowes sells a CCST kit. I've saw a discussion a while ago questioning the legality of who could actually install it. Apparently there is training available online. What your particular locality allows or doesn't allow will vary.
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wrote:

In the above, by kit I meant one that allows you to make custom lengths.
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That's one of the problems. If you just have a short distance you have a hard time finding a peice without buying a lot more than you need. I just run black iron pipe myself.
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On 5/31/2011 6:41 PM, Jim wrote:

What real difference does the symmetry of the basement joists have to do w/ running the line? If you have access, how hard can it be? Is it conventional construction or something unique?
All in all, the black iron is probably the homeowners' diy'ers' choice; as always you'll have to check on local reqm'ts and limitations by the gas company and civil jurisdiction on what's legal there.
--
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Presumably he does not want to have it under the joists so he is looking to avoid drilling holes in all of them. I agree that black iron is the best way to go for diy. I've worked with the flexible pipe and you have to get the fittings installed correctly. Black iron is pretty much fool proof at the low pressures of nat gas. If you dope it up and tighten it, it ain't gonna leak.
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On 6/1/2011 11:08 AM, jamesgangnc wrote: ...

Well he said the problem was "symmetry". I was asking what symmetry, per se, has to do with it.
He didn't say the run was perpendicular to the joist direction. The simple presumption is w/ drilling agreed but was struck by the fact that wasn't what actually said. But, what's so hard about drilling for 3/4" black pipe in standard joist? I was trying to see if there really is something unique or if OP is just a little gun shy.
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Buy a threading die rig and pipe cutter from Harbor Freight if you don't have them. Cut and install black iron pipe. Hang it on the bottom of the joists with proper pipe clips. No need to drill through joists unless you have some extremely unusual home framing system. Use lots of gas type pipe dope and there will be zero leakage. Remember to turn gas on and off at meter as needed... learn how if you haven't been instructed before.
Joe
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