Fishing network cables?

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I need some ethernet cables between my computer room and the TV room. The easiest way is to run the cable in the crawlspace and then up through the floor for about 1 foot.
The plan is to drill a hole from the crawlspace up into the space between two inside walls (one of them is the TV room) and between two studs. Then I can make an opening on the wall for the faceplate and the network jack. There is an electrical outlet on that wall, but I don't think that's going to help.
If I could drill the hole from the top between the walls and between studs, that would be easy. But since I can't get a drill inside the walls, I have to drill up from the crawlspace. How do you identy the area between two drywall, from the crawlspace looking up?
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Use a long 1/8" drill bit or a strong coat hanger cut on a 45 degree angle, drill down though the floor, carpet whatever at the base or the shoe base.
Find that in the basement/crawlspace, factor in an 1-1/2" offset and drill up into the wall cavity. Cut in your box or low voltage opening and fish the wire up.
--
Colbyt
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On 11/2/2011 6:48 PM, Colbyt wrote:

You can even get smaller drill bits than 1/8" that are 6 or 12" long. IMHO this is the easiest way to locate where to drill. I haven't drilled with a coat hanger wire, but I have heard it works.
Locate where the box will be first (to avoid wall studs). You can push a long wire, like a coat hanger, through the hole to make it easier to find below.
If the base 1/4 round can be pried loose easily Nate's idea of drilling between the 1/4 round and baseboard is also good. You only have to separate it a little, but this often messes up the paint.
--
bud--

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Great that you are going wired you will get 1gBps speed on the internal network.
They do make long flexible bits to go from the top down. Otherwise you just measure carefully.
They are called fish bits and you can even dril around corners:
http://www.lashen.com/vendors/BES/Fish_Bits.asp
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bob wrote:

Hi, Long shank drill bit will do by drilling hole thru sole plate of wall frame in an angle from the room where TV is. That's what cable guys do when running cable to TV. If you want to drill from under then you are oing saem thing straight up or in an angle after location of sole plate is found. (jint' row of nailts sticking out ....)
I don't mess with cables any more. Whole house is covered with wireless network now using dual band router.Even shared printer is on wireless.
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responding to http://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/Fishing-network-cables-668805-.htm DA wrote: Tony Hwang wrote:

Wireless equipment manufacturers would have you believe that for sure. On practice though wireless is still 20 times slower than wired and you're guaranteed to have some blind spots where and when you least expect them. Found one not long ago behind a flat screen TV that kills wireless signal extremely efficiently. So, no, definitely do mess with cables if you want a guaranteed and a fast connection.
for OP: if you do get one of those long drill bits (HD or Lowes sells them around $30 apiece), make sure to also get the holder accessory (forgot what they call it) - it's a piece with a handle that can reach inside the wall and guide the drill. And you definitely drill down most of the time - you normally make the outlet hole first because it is dependent on where the service is needed. Once you've taken out enough drywall to mount the outlet box/bracket, there's already enough space to fish the long drill bit in. Be sure to get the smallest diameter drill bit you can get away with. 1/2" is usually enough. Watch for electrical wires, water/gas pipes, air handlers, that sort of obstacles. Would not hurt to check from the outlet to the baseboard with a stud finder and also check downstairs roughly around the place where you think the drill bit will come out. There should be no obstruction within a couple of feet from where you THINK you'll come out. The drill bit can wander, so you don't actually know where you land, you just kinda take an educated guess.
Good luck!
------------------------------------- /\_/\ ((@v@)) NIGHT ():::() OWL VV-VV
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DA wrote:

Hi, It all depends knowing what you are doing. I roll most of what I need myself. My back is in RF telecomm., IT field(data comm.) during all my working days. If I am going to run cable now I'd go optical and be done with it.

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Lowes, for example, has the super long drill bits for these kinds of jobs. Extensions, even, if you have the newly fashionable ultra high ceilings. Most electrical distributors have carried these for years.
Joe
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wrote:

My favorite method is driving a nail right at the edge of the floor - at the wall, then going down below and looking for it. If it is a 2X4 wall with 1/2" drywall you go in about 2 inches.

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On Wed, 02 Nov 2011 23:16:13 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I take a coat hanger and make a drill bit out of it.
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Sure you can. They have 3' and 6' "flexible drill bits" at Home Depot, at telephone stores (if those still exist) , and where did I recently see a big selection of those bits?

It's hard**. You may drill lots of holes in your floor if you're not careful. You should put the hole where you want it in the wall and drill down from there. If you have trouble keeping the part in the wall vertical, they have a metal L-shaped thing that goes half-way into the wall and will hold the drill bit in place, but I never had a use for such a thing.
The bits have a little hole in them for pulling a wire back once the hole is drilled. If you make the first wire 2 or 3 times as long as needed, you can use it like a trolly, taping all the other wires to it and pulling them through, maybe one at a time, maybe more. I guess you can also use a string rather than a wire for that.
What was a hard was lying on a board on the attic trusses, with my arm extneded down the shaft that held the heating ducts, using a 1 foot extenision, and drilling through the plywood between the first and second floor. I guess that's meant to slow down fires, right? But I think a 3/4" hole won't damage that much. I ran a phone line, Romex 12-2, burglar alarm siren wires, burglar alarm sensor wires. and maybe something else though the same hole, using the trolly method.
**From an unfinished attic, without a floor, it's easy see the framing of the wall and easy to drill down. But from underneath, I don't even remember seeing anything holding the plate to the plywood.
I like hardwired. I put my wires in 28 years ago and they've never needed any attention since, and they don't use electricity, and need no other equipment (though I do need a signal amplifier at every second tv-signal splitter. So for 6 tvs, I bought 2 of them 28 years years ago and they've been running ever since.)
They also make wall plates that are designed to just pass the wires through. No connectors involved. They are like an awing, so you can't see into the wall unlless you put your head down on the floor, but the opening is an inch in diameter or more They were 5 dollars at Baynesville, but Baynesville is always expensevie. The kind that was more than a wall plate, that was like a receptacle with plaster-lips that screws into a wall box, was about 8 dollars, and still required a Decora-style plate, but the first kind, that is only a plate is all you need.
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Never heard of a lampmakers bit, got a web site for a description?
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wrote:

That's what I've always heard it described as, it's just basically a really long standard split point bit. Got a couple in my toolbox that I've been given by friends/family when cleaning out deceased relatives' stuff, picked up for cheap at garage sales, etc. Name makes sense to me as if you were making a lamp from scratch from a piece of turned wood you'd need it to provide the path for the zip cord between the base and the socket.
The special flexible electricians' bits as sold by Greenlee etc. probably work better for the OP's application, but I don't have any of those, and they're spendy for as often as I have an application for them. (I did have to break down and buy some long shank spade bits though for running wires in instances where joists were doubled or tripled and a regular spade bit wouldn't punch all the way through in one pass.)
nate
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On 11/3/2011 12:04 PM, N8N wrote:

I have always heard them called "bell bits", but (from google) it looks like they are "bell hanger bits" (in the electrical trade). They are for door bell, and similar wires. There is a small cross hole near the tip - you drill, connect the wire on the other side (via the hole), and pull the drill back out.
--
bud--

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wrote:

I guess that's for drilling up from the basment to put in the doorbell button?
I havent' done that, but I did drill up from the basement to put in the burglar alarm control panel by the front door. I wanted it just above the hall and porch switches. It was hard to control the bit from below and I drilled into the plastic box for the switches and blew the breaker for the hall, which also put me in the dark in the basement!!
But the second time I got it just right, by accident I guess.

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bob wrote:

This may work:
Assuming you can find the wall, drill away. You've got an 90% chance of not hitting a stud. If you do drill six inches or so, with plenty more to go, stop and move over three inches.
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Actually I am using wireless, however the best location for the wireless router is not in the computer room because it is on one end of the house. I need a wired network cable to reach the wireless router that I place in a more central position.
Also, as others have pointed out, wired connections are more reliable. The wireless are for mobile devices. All fixed devices use wired connections.
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bob wrote:

Hmmm, Really? Do you know how many schools and campus, hotel, commercial building, warehouse are WiFi connected? Even my dentist office is all WiFi. In Europe or places like Korea, Japan, China, it is even more so. They are ahead of us.
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Tony Hwang wrote:

I think it's more appropriate to say that all fixed devices would be better off using a wired connection.

Hmmm. Do you know how many times I've been at a hotel and have had a bitch of a time getting a decent wifi signal?
Wifi is a cheap, quick and dirty way to get an internet connection, but frequently it's not implimented properly to insure that it's a good connection.

Just because it's "all over the place" doesn't make it better or more reliable than a hard-wired connection.
For a lot of devices, a wifi connection is your only option.

Wait until Greece finally collapses. Then we'll see if Europe is ahead of us.
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-snip-
Are there also really security issues [maybe with *some* network software? ] My wife's job supplies her with a laptop. The hardwired net connection is the only way she can link to the work computers from home.
Are they just saving on having a wireless modem-- or is there really a security concern?
Jim
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