Fill with What Around Shower Drain Pipe?

I would rather not pour concrete. Is there anything else I can use to fill in the hole around the shower drain pipe shown in the photos at site http://honda.lioness.googlepages.com/showerdrain ? Any other suggestions for remedying this as professionally as possible?
The (Aqua Glass) shower pan cracked so I am replacing it. The main cause seems to be simply that the floor beneath it was neither solid nor level.
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Why not use concrete? It's cheap, simple to mix a bag or two in a plastic tub, and it will work fine.
If you really can't use concrete for some reason then I'm sure you could use 3 part epoxy floorpatch,( resin, hardener, and sand) we use that at work to patch warehouse floors that stand up to forklift traffic, but why spend a fair amount of extra money for something when the cheap simple solution would do fine?
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Mike S.
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Any hard floor leveler, such as Jiff Set, but concrete is still cheaper.
JK
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Get over it. Nothing else will perform as well for the price. After you get a grip, take the time to plan what you need and you won't feel overwhelmed by the task. For openers, the better materials are premixed, like Sakcrete. The bag sizes vary from store to store, so go look at some and note the weight (can you deal with an 80 lb. bag, for example?). Note the volume, so you can calculate what you need. Look at mixing containers, such as large plastic tubs (kitty litter box, maybe) or even the small mortar or drywall mud mixing containers with convenient sloping sides. See the short handled hoes that are used with the mixing box. Look at trowels, scoops, stuff like that. Consider firming up your substrate with serious tamping. Cheap tamping tools can be had if you can't improvise. For a large volume concrete mix would serve well, allowed to cure and topped off to smoothness by mason mix. Or all mason mix for a small volume. Plan ahead as to where you want to clean your equipment for later use. A remote part of the yard or garden is good, Have a bucket of water handy for mopping up, etc. Ask around and see if there isn't a friend or two that has some familiarity with projects like this. You can do it, so have at it and enjoy the results. Good luck.
Joe
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Mike, Jake, and Joe, you all are right. I am over it and will give the concrete a shot weekend. Thank you for the input.
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The cement mixing and pouring went fine. I used something called mortar "quikcrete" which we had laying around. I leveled the new cement with a 2x4 and then water cured it per the packaging directions, but then it seems to have swelled noticeably while drying in the last 24 hours. The new cement is no longer even with the surrounding edge. I pre-fitted the shower base and I get a big of ponding. Is there some kind of sander I could use to level the cement a bit?
Pardon if these are naive questions. Making progress here; learning things useful. :-)
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