Fence Posts

Hi, I have to build a small section of wooden fence. I need to plant two posts into concrete, I've never done this before. Do they go directly into the concrete? or do you put some kind of mounting hardware in the concrete then attach them to that? If they go directly into the concrete, then how many inches should be underground ? thanks
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Rule of thumb is 1/3rd the post is in the ground so the total post length is 4-thirds the height of the fence.
Most who do the concrete around the post thing do just dump it in around the post. I personally don't much like the "concrete around the post" way except for a corner post that may really need additional lateral support and where there isn't ample room for adequate bracing, but that's me.
One can also simply use quikrete ready-mix to pack the whole and let it set up w/ ground water as a simple expedient compared to mixing it. Somewhat easier to retain the position and achieve plumb that way as don't need bracing while the mix cures.
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In frosty area 3 feet depth; however 30 inches seems to work here for fence not over 4 to 5 feet. It will be interesting to see how our neighbours six footer stands up after a couple of winters; it's a fairly windy location with gusts to 90 to 100 kilometres per hour and higher. If using cement do not fill up to ground level. The cement plug so formed will get eased/heaved up out of the ground by frost. Thus raising the post with it. Put some cement around the foot (and throw in any stones, if you have them); using pressure treated wood posts and or soaking the bottom of the post in preservative. Post will later rot off at ground level; so slope ground surface away from post hole if you can, to minimize water from pooling around post. Not only fences; have built several sheds (last 30 years) using same method. Also our 20+ year old deck using stubs of old creosote telephone poles, but not cemented at all, then cutting them off to desired level.
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terry wrote:

Yeah, in areas where it's wet enough frost heave might be an issue -- we're plenty cold, but dry and sandy enough heaving is so minimal that for fences never think about it as an issue --
Don't need to tell me about windy locations, though...those kinds of gusts are pretty routine here as well--in fact we just spent a full two days of it last weekend w/ no measurable moisture in the front following to make up for it (as again is so often the case) :(
--
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I recently used that to set a mailbox post. Worked great! Get the post where you want it, pour in the dry mix and pour water on it.
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Even better, put the water in the hole first, then pour in the mix. Poke it with a stick to mix. (Wow! I just recommended poking something with a stick!)
--
Steve B.
New Life Home Improvement
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

1. Dig hole 1/2 height of top of pole (i.e., 6' above ground = 3 feet under ground). Typical is 8' pole sunk 3' below grade. 2. Put 1-3" or more of rocks in bottom of hole. 3. Center pole vertically in hole - use braces. 4. Pour mixed concrete in hole (use wheelbarrow to mix).
There are some modifications to the above steps.
Consider also metal posts to which you strap 4x4s. Cheaper, easier to work with, won't rot, etc.
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On Sun, 20 Apr 2008 08:44:23 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Protect your posts from moisture from the soil and rain.
After digging the hole, toss in some rocks and then your concrete and then set the post on top of the wet concrete. When you fill the hole to the top, slope the concrete away from the post in a cone shape so moisture does NOT stand next to the post.
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On Apr 20, 11:44 am, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Are you sure they "need" concrete...?
I might use concrete for some reason, I just can't think of one. A post has to rot, eventually, then there's just a big hunk of concrete to be frost heaved or a complete PITA when the post needs substitution or removal.
But I'm no fence expert, just a former farm boy. -----
- gpsman
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gpsman wrote: ...

Me too, except former and now returned.
I'm in the process at present of rebuilding sections of the feedlots which entail replacing a few of the ties. :(
--
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wrote:

I use quarter minus and a little concrete on top to prevent standing water. No problems for years, works great. Agree its PITA to remove a big chunk of concrete, two 80# sacks per hole!
A

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