"Faux" sandblasting glass

We bought a unit which has a huge (7' X 9') mirror on the dining room wall. The unit once had a Great Dane (nice lap dog for a townhouse) living in it, who apparently liked to attack the image in the mirror. Result: Several permanent (2'-3' long) scratches in the surface of the mirror, vertical, with an arcing shape. Fortunately, the scratches are at the ends, not in the center.
What I'd like to do is hide the scratches among a desert scene - like palm trees, cactus, whatever - using something which will produce a "sandblasted" look. I don't know if such a product even exists, but I do remember something similar... a paint-on concoction which shrivels when it dries, to look like stained glass, coupled with another concoction, which makes it look like leaded glass.
The problem is that I don't know where to find such a thing, or even what to ask for. My best guess is that this might be found at an arts and crafts type of shop. ??? If I can find the right product, then I'll either need an artist, or a stencil, but, first things first.
Any ides? TIA,
Unc
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http://www.angelsdream.com/how_to_acid_etch.htm
Further details: http://www.google.com "acid etch" + glass
John
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you can get "frosted glass" paint in spray cans in most good painting sections/stores. I've seen both colored and colorless.
There is also faux stained glass, made by a couple manufactures. The only one that comes to mind right now is Plaid Gallery glass. (http://www.plaidonline.com/apGG.asp ) I've seen others as well. (I seem to recall "Prism" brand... but a quick google search didn't turn it up in the first few links)
Craft stores (Michaels, Jo-Ann Fabrics (and crafts), Pat Catan's) or Hobby shops should have something.
Good Luck.
--
be safe.
flip
Ich habe keine Ahnung was das bedeutet, oder vielleicht doch?
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Thanks for the links. I Googled "glass etching cream" and can get everything I'll need (except for the courage to actually take this project on), including "how to."
Being 4 months and 1400 miles away from said mirror, I have some time to plan my attack. At a glance, I'm not seeing any stencils/patterns available in the size I'll need, and free-hand art is not my forte. Meanwhile, Plan B: There are plenty of talented Mexican artists in the general area, capable of sketching a mural. From there, they might even talk me into painting it on, rather than etching. Either way, I'm convinced that I can turn this mirror into something worthy of taking up an entire wall.
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If you do use actual etching cream, make ABSOLUTELY sure you you follow all directions for safety. Read the MSDS on them if you can find it. Many of them will penetrate bare skin and give subtissue burns which are not immediately apparent.
I'm not saying stay away from the stuff... Thet are fine products and will do a nice job. I'm just saying be careful.
I recently used McKay Velvet Etching Cream and was really pleased with it. What *REALLY* pleased me was that when i called the company to get the MSDS and instructions, Bob McKay answered the tech support line and emailed me the information in under an hour. (I have no connections with this company. (Well, at least none of which that I know.))

For etching, it's likely you would use contact paper and cut out the design (leaving the paper where you do not want to etch)
If you want to play around, look for the spray can stuff which is really a cloudy clear paint. It will be much more forgiving as the results are reversible with a scraper.
good luck!
--
be safe.
flip
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Look for Delta PermEnamel White Frost "glass etching" paint. Available at craft stores, usually in the acrylic paint aisle.
It doesn't really etch. It's just a frosted clear-coat paint that goes on with a brush. Clean up brushes w/soapy water before it dries. I found I needed 2-3 very thin coats to looks good. It's AP rated non-toxic, so no fumes either.
After setting for 10 days it becomes dishwasher-safe.
I've used it with a stencil to "etch" a plain glass candle bowl. Looks exactly like I used real acid etch. I've used true acid etching products, and while they work great, they're messier and there's more room for error. With the Delta stuff, you can gently scrape off areas that may bleed under the stencil.
You can use clear Contac for a stencil, just burnish the edges well with the back of a spoon (or a brayer/roller, if you happen to have one).
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Good idea! The more I think about etching, the more I wish for an easier way, with fewer potential pitfalls. I really like the idea of having a second chance, should the first attempt not turn out. I don't really like this mirror (or even the concept of having a mirrored-wall), but there it is, and the thing is worth a fortune... besides, it's way too big to remove.
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