Fabricate my own flood stop solenoid for washing machine

My laundry room is on the 2nd floor of the house. I want to safeguard against hose burst flooding. (Beyond just steel braided hoses)
I am not satisfied with the "Flood Stop" which is all over Google as that is a "normally open" valve. In the event of power supply failure it would be useless.
My plan follows:
1. Get two "normally closed" solenoid valves, one for hot, one for cold. 2. Adapt the solenoid valve inlet to the hose thread on the gate valve. 3. Use steel braided hoses from the valve output. 4. Replace the receptacle in the laundry closet with a GFCI version to power the solenoids. 5. Wire a 120v relay to the light switch. This relay will control the solenoids and the switch will be electrically isolated from the solenoids.
With this in place, the washer water supply hoses have pressure only if the laundry room light is on.
So far I've received only puzzled and confused looks from the local plumbing shops, they have been very little help. (Uh, what's so hard to understand?) They've got nothing out-of-the-box that fits this application. I'm curious to know ballpark fill rates for washing machines in gallons per minute in order to gauge what size valves to buy.
If a solenoid valve fails, I *assume* it fails in its "normal" position. Can you confirm or deny this? Does the solenoid valve itself pose a hazard of leaking in the event of its failure, such as leaking out through the top or something?
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031124 2345 - Ryan wrote:

You could get a couple of those motorized zone valves that are used on hot water heating systems. They come in 1/2" or 3/4", and you can adapt them to the hot and cold water pipes that are there. Get a transformer and a switch and wire it to the valves. The valves are on when the switch is on and when the switch is turned off, the valves close automatically. The transformer could also be wired to the light you mentioned rather than a separate switch.
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hot>water heating systems.
I don't know about that one skippy, the water pressure at my house opens my honeywells right up.
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031125 1021 - AjaysLincolnLogs wrote:

Actually, a lot of water pressure is not needed for a washing machine. A regulator could be put before the motorized valves.
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Zone valves don't actually seal closed.
And solenoid valves, at least none that I've seen, are not rated for hot water.
And they're all not recommended for indoor use.
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You need quite a few PSI to get the washer to fill with reasonable speed. The circulator pump on a hydronic heating system doesn't create that pressure, so the zone valves don't have to be built to hold it back... so if you're into homebrewing, look more to irrigation control valves for withstanding city water pressure. They are not expensive and available at Lowes in the plumbing section. Don't know how they like hot water, though, so you're on your own.
Or buy the thing already built and listed with the proper agencies as
http://www.watts-intelliflow.com /
"The Watts IntelliFlow Automatic Washing Machine Shutoff Valve uses a state-of-the-art electronic control device that senses the washing machine current flow. When the washing machine is turned on, the controls detect the current flow to the washer, opening both hot and cold water inlet valves to allow water to flow to the washing machine. When the washing machine completes the full cycle the device senses the lack of current and closes the water inlet valves. These valves remain closed until the machine is used again. The IntelliFlow's automatic operation and floor mounted leak sensor protect against catastrophic water damage should a washing machine inlet hose burst while the machine is in use."
If you are homebrewing a plumbing device that interfaces with the electrical system, remember that any insurance claim for fire or flood that somehow involves that part of the house might be blamed on your device. Lack of an agency approval (like IAPMO or UL) would not work in your favor.
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snipped-for-privacy@worldnet.att.net (modervador) wrote in message

Here's another:
http://www.smarthome.com/7115.html
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Will this work? http://www.watts-intelliflow.com/howitworks.htm

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